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Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture Annual Forum

14 - 17 June 2016

The Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture held its Annual Forum from 14 to 16 June, on the theme Climate-Smart Agriculture in Action.
GACSA's ambitious future is based upon supporting and inspiring action. Farmers, fishers, foresters, and ranchers are at the center of this action, and therefore GACSA is devoting its Annual Forum to showcasing climate-smart agriculture in action...

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Third EAT Stockholm Food Forum, 2016

13 - 14 June 2016

FANRPAN CEO, Dr LM Sibanda attended the EAT Stockholm Food Forum that was held in Sweden on June 13th - 14th 2016. Dr Sibanda has been recently appointed as commissioner on the EAT-Lancet Commission on Sustainable Healthy Food Systems...

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GCARD3 (2015-2016): No One Left Behind: Agri-food Innovation and Research for a Sustainable World, 5-8 April 2016, Johannesburg South Africa

5 - 8 April 2016

On Tuesday 5th April 2016, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda delivered the Keynote address at the official opening of the GCARD3 in Johannesburg South Africa. FANRPAN's participation in the GCRAD 3 continued with Dr Sibanda chairing a session on the Agricultural Research Council (ARC) Day in Pretoria. Over 500 delegates attended the GCARD3. ...

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Justice for Women Lecture

25 April 2016

The 2016 Justice for Women Lecture was presented by Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda on March 24 at the Abomson Community Education Centre. Dr Sibanda discussed, Overcoming Food Insecurity – Ideas & Inspiration from Zimbabwe to Maine. Dr Sibanda presented a lecture on the First 1000 Days focussing on ATONU. She delivered the fifth annual Justice for Women Lecture, presented by Maine Law at the Abramson Community Education Center in Portland, to a sold-out crowd. ...

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PRESS RELEASE: CHAMPIONS 12.3 COALITION EXPANDS MEMBERS, ACTIONS TO HELP REDUCE FOOD LOSS & WASTE

25 April 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) - Ahead of the United Nations General Assembly High-level Thematic Debate on achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement signing ceremony, the Champions 12.3 coalition announced six new international leaders joining its effort to inspire ambition and mobilize action to reduce global food loss and waste ...

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Global expert to Maine: Not all hungry people are 'welfare cases'

19 March 2016

PORTLAND, Maine - Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda remembers as a child looking forward to drinking a big mug of milk with a tablespoon of cereal in it every day after she walked to school in Zimbabwe.
At the time, she said, she didn't understand hunger was a global issue.
"We just thought it was part of going to school," Sibanda, CEO and head of mission of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, said Friday, speaking with the Bangor Daily News by phone from New York. "But today that doesn't happen. Children who walk to school barefoot - they've not had breakfast. That would have made a big difference to me." ...

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Maine Law to welcome global leader in fight to end hunger and food insecurity

8 March 2016

PORTLAND, Maine, March 17, 2016 -- Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, a global leader in the sustainable farming movement and the fight to end hunger and food insecurity, will visit Maine next week for the fifth annual Justice for Women Lecture, presented by the University of Maine School of Law. Dr. Sibanda is an acclaimed scientist, farmer, and activist. She will spend the entire week in Maine, speaking with a wide range of students and groups about the barriers people face in accessing affordable, nutritious food, and solutions to those problems. "This topic could not be more timely. Hunger and food insecurity are on the rise here in Maine, as they are in too many places around the world," said Danielle Conway, Dean at Maine Law. "Dr. Sibanda is an incredible resource to discuss problems and solutions, and hopefully to inspire action both here and abroad. We're honored to be her host as she engages Mainers in these crucial conversations."

For more, view these press links of Dr. Sibanda.

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WOMEN FARMERS - THE CORNERSTONE OF AFRICAN AGRICULTURE

8 March 2016

The Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), celebrates the International Women's Day - 8 March 2016. We pay special tribute to all the women in the agriculture sector who remain committed, focussed and enduring to feed their families, communities, nations and the world. The gender statistics in the sector remain glaringly unbalanced as climate change and malnutrition continue to challenge households. It is pertinent that Africa understand these challenges when addressing agriculture. This sector remains one of the important economic generators for the continent contributing 25% of the continent's GDP. This accounts for over 60% of African citizens who rely on agriculture. Women make up almost 50% of the agricultural labour force in Sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 62% of economically active women in Africa work in agriculture, making it the largest employer of women. In some countries, such as Rwanda, Malawi and Burkina Faso, over 90% of economically active women are involved in agriculture (AfDB, 2015)...

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Dear U.N., Why Is It Mainly A Man's World At The Climate Conference?

11 December 2015

Dear United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon,
"Get Cross."
"Break the silence."
"When you witness violence against women and girls, do not sit back. Act."
Those are your words, Mr. Ban Ki-moon. As the U.N. secretary general, you have been forward about promoting gender equality and denouncing violence against women. Yet this month, at the Paris Climate Conference (COP21), one of the biggest conferences in the world, where important decisions about climate change and our planet's future are being discussed and debated, very few women participated or had a chance to voice their views.

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FANRPAN CEO -Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda recipient of Science Forum South Africa Science Diplomacy Awards

9 December 2015,CSIR International Convention Centre, Pretoria

Dr Sibanda was awarded the Science Forum South Africa Science Diplomacy Award on Wednesday, 9th December 2015, in Pretoria by South African Minister of Science and Technology, Hon. Minister Naledi Pandor. The SFSA Science Diplomacy Award was presented to her in the category recognizing "an individual effort over a career to put science at service of fostering international friendship."

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Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, FANRPAN CEO attends the 2015 Borlaug Dialogue of the World Food prize

14-16 October 2015, Des Moines, Iowa

The World Food Prize is the foremost international award recognizing the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the world. It was created by Dr Norman E. Borlaug in 1986. The World Food Prize emphasizes the importance of a nutritious and sustainable food supply for all people.

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FANRPAN CEO Speaks at the 2nd International Conference on Global Food Security

11-14 October 2015

FANRPAN CEO Speaks at the 2nd International Conference on Global Food Security | Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA

FANRPAN CEO, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, attended the 2nd International Conference on Global Food Security where she was also a keynote speaker. The conference aim was to deliver state-of-the-art analysis, inspiring visions and innovative methods arising from research in a wide range of disciplines, in order to achieve global food security.

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TEDxJohannesburg 2015, Moonshots

19 November 2015

FANRPAN CEO Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda will be one of the speakers at the TEDxJohannesburg Moonshots event on 19th November 2015.

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda grew up on a farm in rural Zimbabwe. She believes her strong personal connection to Africa’s agricultural traditions is what helped her become one of the continent’s leading advocates for food and nutrition security. As CEO of FANRPAN, Lindiwe coordinates food security policy research and advocacy programs in 17 African countries. In 2010, she was invited into the Guardian Global Development Advisory Panel and identified as one the world’s most influential thinkers and provocative new voices. Lindiwe believes Africa’s rainbow revolution will feed the world. Lindiwe is an Aspen Institute 2014 New Voices Fellow.

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United Nations Third International Conference on Financing for Development
Side event: “Leadership and Partnership to Achieve Global Food Security”

16 July 2015

FANRPAN CEO Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda participated in the side event: “Leadership and Partnership to achieve Global Food Security” during the United Nations Third International Conference on Financing for Development. The event was co-hosted by the U.S. Government and the African Union Commission.

The event highlighted how proven approaches to food security and nutrition spurred by the African Union's Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program (CAADP) are working across Africa and on other continents. With support from the U.S. Government's cornerstone global food security initiative, Feed the Future, and in partnership with governments, civil society, development partners, and the private sector, the country-led approach to development is helping to unlock the transformative potential in agriculture to sustainably address the challenge of global hunger.

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United Nations Third International Conference on Financing for Development to be held 13th to 16th of July 2015

13 July 2015

FANRPAN participates in the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, 13-16 July 2015. The event brought together high-level political representatives, including Heads of State and Government, and Ministers of Finance, Foreign Affairs and Development Cooperation, as well as all relevant institutional stakeholders, non-governmental organizations and business sector entities.

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5th Annual LCIRAH conference to be held on the 3rd and 4th of June 2015

02 June 2015

The Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health (LCIRAH) is hosting its 5th annual research conference, at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, on the 3rd and 4th of June, 2015. The aim is to bring together scholars from different sectors to explore inter-disciplinary approaches to understanding agri-health. This year, the LCIRAH annual conference celebrates its 5th year, providing an opportunity to gather researchers from around the world to examine and reflect critically on what we have learned from agriculture, nutrition and health research in the past five years and what the future research agenda should look like. Research studies presented will fall into one of the following themes: Women and child health outcomes; Behaviour change/consumer acceptance; Innovative metrics & tools; Diversifying local agricultural production & diets; Value chain approaches to nutrition; Nutrition sensitive agriculture policy. FANRPAN will be represented by its CEO, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.

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FANRPAN CEO attends the Federation of Africa Nutrition Societies conference 2015 in Tanzania

25-29 May 2015, Arusha city, Tanzania

The Federation of Africa Nutrition Societies (FANUS) was established to promote collaboration and capacity-building among Africa-based nutrition scientists and practitioners affiliated with national nutrition societies. During its decade of existence, the Federation has promoted excellence in nutrition leadership through its four-yearly conferences. The 3rd FANUS conference 2015 was held in Arusha, Tanzania bringing together people from a wide array of sectors– including researchers, policy-makers, program implementers, and the private sector who share interest in alleviating malnutrition.

FANRPAN CEO, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda was invited to speak at the 3rd FANUS conference 2015, which was held in Arusha, Tanzania. In her talk, Dr Sibanda underlined the need for a multi-sectoral approach in addressing under-nutrition. She also busted some of the malnutrition myths which among others included the belief that “There are ‘special foods’ for men and not for women and children”. The main focus of the conference was to take stock of whether Africa has achieved the MDGs, and to set goals for the next round of nutrition development in Africa. Conference themes covered: nutrition in Africa-changing patterns and causalities; nutrition as a human right or as an investment case; Nutrition governance and accountability – who is responsible?; Breast-feeding and complementary feeding - Why is the obvious so difficult?; Maternal nutrition-the neglected factor!; Obesity and NCDs in Africa-Time to act!; Nutrition training and education-Are we providing the right skill-set?

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Knowledge, Skills and Talent Development in the Agri-Food Sector

04 October 2013

Development in the Agri-Food Sector
Recruiting talent into agriculture
Wednesday, October 9 / 8:30 - 9:30 am
Austria Room

Join a discussion in how to attract, recruit, and retain people to achieve growth, sustainability and security across the entire food chain.

SPEAKERS

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda: Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), South Africa
Matteo Bartolini: President, European Council of Young Farmers, Italy
Kristin Davis: Executive Secretary, Global Forum For Rural Advisory Services, Switzerland
Patrick O'Quin: Vice President Multilateral Affairs, Danone, France
Keith Polo: Lead of Agribusiness, ImagineNations, Italy

This year's Yara Prize honours hard-hitting and long-term policy advocacy by ILRI board chair Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

05 September 2013

The Yara Prize 2013 was yesterday awarded to Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and chair of the board of trustees of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI).

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The Yara Prize honours youth entrepreneurship and policy advocacy

07 August 2013

Oslo (2013-08-19): The Yara Prize 2013 is being awarded to Mr. Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

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About Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission

Email: Lmsibanda@fanrpan.org

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda has been the chief executive officer and head of mission of the Africa-wide Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) since 2004. Dr Sibanda led the development of the strategy and business plans that FANRPAN is currently implementing (2007-2015). She is currently coordinating policy research and advocacy programs within the African continent, all aimed at making Africa a food-secure region. Her portfolio includes policy research and advocacy programmes on food policies, agricultural productivity and markets, rural livelihoods and climate change.

Dr Sibanda is an animal scientist by training and a practicing commercial beef cattle farmer and has been on the forefront of the agriculture, food security and climate change global policy agenda.

In 2012, Dr Sibanda was appointed Board Chair of the world's leading livestock organisation, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI).

In 2011, Dr Sibanda was nominated to serve on the independent science panel of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research of the Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Programme (CCAFS), aimed at driving new research on the interactions between climate change, agriculture, natural resource management and food security, and to create unique possibilities in the search for cutting-edge solutions to climate change and food-security problems.

In August 2010 she was co-opted into the Guardian Global Development advisory panel as one of the world's most influential thinkers and provocative new voices.

In 2009 she led the No Agriculture, No Deal global campaign and mobilised African civil society organisations to push for the inclusion of agriculture in the United Nations Framework for Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC) Copenhagen negotiations.

Since 2008 Dr Sibanda has been a leading advocate for the Farming First global campaign – advocating for a holistic approach to sustainable agricultural development. She is an animal scientist by training and a practising commercial beef cattle farmer.

She received her BSc degree at the University of Alexandria in Egypt, and her MSc and PhD at the University of Reading in the UK.

Dr Sibanda is also the brains and founding editor as well as Editor-In-Chief of Africa's new agriculture magazine, AgriDeal. She has written for a lot of leading world media organisations such as SciDev, The Guardian Newspaper to name a few.

She serves on numerous international boards and advisory councils and has published a number of policy materials in international media, journal articles and book chapters. Some of the Dr Sibanda's governance and advisory responsibilities include:

  • International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), board of trustees
  • International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), board of trustees
  • Independent Science Panel for CRP5 (Water, Land and Ecosystems)
  • Independent Science Panel for CRP7 (Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Programme (CCAFS)
  • Independent Science Panel for CRP2 (Policies, Institutions and Markets to Strengthen Food Security and Incomes for the Rural Poor)
  • Africa Interact Advisory Board
  • Montpellier Panel
  • Nelson Mandela Foundation aids2031 hyper-endemic pillar

News


2015

The Moth Radio Hour: Farms, fish banks, and an iron roof

16 April 2015

Storytellers in this hour are New Voices Fellows from the Aspen Institute who participated in a Moth Community Workshop. A leading advocate for food security reassesses her own relationship to food, a young man dreams of an iron roof for his family, a pragmatic idealist learns to really listen to her friend, and a marine expert tries to bring fish back to Bali.

Featuring stories by:

  • Lindiwe Majele Sibanda
  • James Kassaga
  • Sisonke Msimang
  • Jensi Sartin

Please visit the following site to listen to the featured stories:http://listen.themoth.org/aspen/?utm_source=Lindiwe&utm_medium=Storyteller&utm_campaign=Aspen

2014

Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa's Soils

4 December 2014

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of FANRPAN is interviewed by Talk Radio 702 on the new Montpellier Panel report 'No Ordinary Matter: Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa's Soils' on Thursday 4th December 2014 at the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome - ahead of World Soil Day on the 5th of December.

In sub-Saharan Africa, an estimated 65 per cent of soils are degraded, and unable to nourish the crops the chronically food insecure continent requires. Poverty, climate change, population pressures and inadequate farming techniques are leading to a continuous decline in the health of African soils, whilst the economic loss is estimated at USD 68 billion per year. Conversely, better land management practices could deliver up to USD 1.4 trillion globally in increased crop production – 35 times the losses.

This report from the Montpellier Panel argues that if left unaddressed, the cycle of poor land management will result in higher barriers to food security, agricultural development for smallholder farmers and wider economic growth for Africa.

The report is a comprehensive analysis of land management in Africa today. For more, please visit / download the report: No Ordinary Matter: Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa’s Soils

The alternate future of African farming

23 October 2014

Dismal figures dominate conversations on food security in Africa. Up to 230 million Africans are chronically malnourished, and 40 percent of children under the age of 5 will experience stunted mental and physical development. Just last week, and as World Food Day put a spotlight on these issues, the International Food Policy Research Institute released its latest Global Hunger Index, topped - unsurprisingly - by sub-Saharan African countries. Angola, Chad and Sierra Leone were recorded as having the highest under-5 mortality rate due to hunger, ranging from 15 percent to more than 18 percent.


2013

Real change in food security through innovation platforms, where science marries local know-how

Women, although major contributors to agricultural production, are often left out of the development equation.“45% of households in Africa are led by women… Women are the source of 80% of food produced in countries stricken by famine and malnutrition… however less than 10% [of these] women can access financial resources for farming.” Those were the words of Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, the keynote speaker at the side event called “Empowering women and youth for improved productivity and resilience of African Agriculture” at AASW6 organized by FARA. http://ypard.net/2013-july-29/tending-real-food-producers August Real change in food security through innovation platforms, where science marries local know-how The change starts from those who are affected by the problem being around the table with those who want to experiment research and deliver options for development, sitting as equal partners. (Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda) Science alone cannot help Africa feed itself. That was a strong message from Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food Agriculture and Natural Resource Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) at the recent Africa Agricultural Science Week (AASW) organised by the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), 15-19 July, 2013.

http://nilebdc.org/2013/08/12/aasw-lindiwe/

2012

What women want from DOHA

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of Food Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Advocacy Network and spokesperson for global agriculture coalition Farming First Women are the fountain of life. They are mothers, innovators, educators, farmers and custodians of the environment, particularly rural women.

http://www.stakeholderforum.org/sf/outreach/index.php/component/content/article?id=1117

2011

Climate change call to action issued at agriculture

Climate change call to action issued at agriculture and rural development day in Durban The city of Durban played host to this year's annual Agriculture and Rural Development Day on Saturday 3rd December in parallel with the COP17 climate change negotiations. Hosted by 17 leading agricultural organisations, the all-day event brought together more than 500 agricultural experts, including policymakers and negotiators, journalists, farmers and scientists to discuss priorities to boost agricultural production while supporting adaptation and mitigation to climate change. The day saw the agricultural sector unite to raise its voice within the broader debates of the climate change negotiations as 19 of the world's leading agricultural organisations jointly endorsed a letter calling on COP17 negotiators to take concrete action and include agriculture in the text of the climate agreement. These groups include three United Nations agencies, the World Bank, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), FANRPAN, Farming First, the Global Forum on Agricultural Research, the Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions (SACAU) and the World Farmers' Organisation. ………………A number of key learning events took place during the day, which looked at the successes in agricultural adaptation and mitigation. Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), opened a side event which focussed on methods for building the resilience of African smallholder farmers in a changing climate.

http://rashtriyalokdal.com/2011-12-22-08-55-23/agriculture-news/135-agriculture-news-dec-13

2010

Broad coalition gathers to open the door for agriculture in international climate change negotiations

Not content to see farming remain outside the international climate change negotiations under way in Mexico, a broad coalition of 17 organizations will bring together more than 400 policy makers, farmers, scientists, business leaders and development specialists on Saturday, December 4 to define steps for opening the door to agriculture within the next six months, permitting its full inclusion in both national action plans as well as the global climate agenda. "Sub-Saharan Africa is among the regions that will be hardest hit by climate change," said Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and Farming First spokesperson. "Unless action is taken now to help farmers respond, the impacts of climate change could derail the region's revitalized efforts to transform the agricultural sector and deflate the optimism this has created about a uniquely African 'Green and Rainbow' Revolution."

http://www.brightsurf.com/news/headlines/61127/Broad_coalition_gathers_to_open_the_door_for_agriculture_in_international_climate_change_negotiations.html

2009

Climate change experts must remember Africa and agriculture

When Africans arrive in Copenhagen later this year, they will have one important message to deliver to their peers: a climate change deal without agriculture is no deal for Africa, argues Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda Agriculture is the life-blood of the African economy. Some 75% of the continent's population are farmers, and the crops they grow provide an important means of livelihood for the most vulnerable smallholder farmers. Agriculture also gives those in the rural sector access to a potential source of additional income if they have surplus crops that can be sold at market. Agricultural commodities already represent more than one-third of total exports from Africa. http://cquestor.blogspot.com/2009/09/climate-change-experts-must-remember.html Investment, Information Keys To Productivity Sep 25 2009 (IPS) – Sustained investment in agriculture accompanied by effective and inclusive policies are key strategies for Southern Africa to address the global food crisis. This was the declaration made by 200 international delegates – including farmers, researchers, private sector representatives, media and policy makers – who gathered in the Malawian capital, Lilongwe, from Sep. 2 to 5 for the annual policy dialogue hosted by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN).

http://africa.ipsterraviva.net/2009/08/26/investment-information-keys-to-productivity/

2008

Climate change-africa: Trade Carbon for Food Security

Forget the view of climate change as impending catastrophe for a moment: if negotiators can recognise sustainable agriculture by African smallholders and forests as mitigating factors in climate change, carbon trading could become an important support for Africa's food security. Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) CEO, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, urged Africa to speak with one voice in pushing for the inclusion of sustainable agriculture in the carbon trade. “Unless the successor to the Kyoto Protocol values the contribution that sustainable agriculture can make to the global carbon market, Africa is still outside the fence,” said Sibanda.

http://www.ipsnews.net/2008/11/climate-change-africa-trade-carbon-for-food-security/

2007

Southern Africa: HIV-induced famine's impact on agriculture

Most rural dwellers in the region live in extreme poverty (IRIN) - Hunger and HIV/AIDS are reinforcing each other in Southern Africa, "leading to a potentially tragic new level of famine", says a book published by a regional agricultural think-tank. The World Bank's annual report, released last week, also raises concerns over the pandemic's impact, pointing out that most people affected by HIV and AIDS depend on agriculture. Food consumption has been found to drop by 40 percent in homes afflicted by HIV/AIDS, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO); globally, Southern Africa is the region most affected by the pandemic. Often described as "new variant famine" or "HIV-induced famine", this form is radically different from traditional famines, said the book, Silent Hunger: Policy Options for Effective Responses to the Impact of HIV and AIDS on Agriculture and Food Security in the SADC Region. "The paradox is that while the traditional drought-related famines kill dependents first (children and elderly), the HIV-related 'silent hunger' affects the most 'productive' family members first." The book is based on a study commissioned by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) on the impact of HIV and AIDS in the seven most affected countries in Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

http://www.irinnews.org/report/75067/southern-africa-hiv-induced-famine-s-impact-on-agriculture

Videos

2015

Launching of Agriculture to Nutrition (ATONU) Project

Launch of Agriculture to Nutrition (ATONU): Improving Nutrition Outcomes Through Optimized Agricultural Investments Project.

2014

Theatre Opens the Brain and the Heart to Climate Smart Agriculture

In Zulu, my native language, there is no accurate and literal translation for the complex issues farmers now face. Climate change, nutrition and policy: these translate to weather, food and rules respectively. But many people would say that none of these are accurate translations.

So how best do I help farming communities in Africa like the one where I come from -- the places that are suffering the worst effects of climate change but who are the least involved in big policy meetings and global dialogues. The September 2014 Global Climate Summit convened for world Leaders by the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki Moon, left behind most farmers puzzled and asking, "Why are they talking about climate smart agriculture? Do they think famers lack intelligence about the weather?

Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa's Soils

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of FANRPAN is interviewed by Talk Radio 702 on the new Montpellier Panel report 'No Ordinary Matter: Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa's Soils' on Thursday 4th December 2014 at the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome - ahead of World Soil Day on the 5th of December.

In sub-Saharan Africa, an estimated 65 per cent of soils are degraded, and unable to nourish the crops the chronically food insecure continent requires. Poverty, climate change, population pressures and inadequate farming techniques are leading to a continuous decline in the health of African soils, whilst the economic loss is estimated at USD 68 billion per year. Conversely, better land management practices could deliver up to USD 1.4 trillion globally in increased crop production – 35 times the losses.

This report from the Montpellier Panel argues that if left unaddressed, the cycle of poor land management will result in higher barriers to food security, agricultural development for smallholder farmers and wider economic growth for Africa.

The report is a comprehensive analysis of land management in Africa today. For more, please visit / download the report: No Ordinary Matter: Conserving, Restoring and Enhancing Africa’s Soils

2014: The 2014 Borlaug Dialogue

2014 Panel: Focus on Africa - Policy and Partnerships

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda led this panel focused on Africa, with H.E. Florence Chenoweth, Birtukan Dagnachew, H.E. Gerardine Mukeshimana, Paul Schickler, and H.E. Joseph Sam Sesay.

2014: IARU Sustainability Science Congress

IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Opening session held at the congress in October 2014

2013

Transformative partnerships for a food-secure world

Learning together transforms agriculture and lives. Narrated by food policy leader Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.

2012

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO FANRPAN moderated the Opening & High Level Panel: Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day during the COP 18 held in Doha, Qatar. This was filmed live at Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day 5, 3 December 2012 in Doha, Qatar. http://www.agricultureday.org ?. A opening keynote address was done by Mr Fahad Bin Mohammed Al-Attiya, Chairman of the Qatar National Food Security Commission.

The event looked at identifying scalable solutions, gaps, and trade offs in addressing climate change impacts for agriculture, landscapes and livelihoods Other dignitaries that were part of the panel includes Tony La Vina, Dean, Ateneo School of Government, The Philippines, Professor Judi Wakhungu, Executive Director of the African Centre for Technology Studies, Robert Carlson, President, World Farmers' Organisation, Dr Mahmoud Solh, Director General, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).

2011

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda talks about "No Agriculture No Deal". AgriTV interviews FANRPAN about COP17

2010

In Mozambique: Lessons for African Agriculture and Food Security farmingfirst.org Two experts on African agricultural development visited farms in Mozambique ahead of the G20 meeting in Pittsburgh. In this video, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, and Dr. Julie Howard, Executive Director of the Partnership to End Hunger and Poverty in Africa, listen to farmers and translate their concerns to the rest of the world. Policymakers must target development aid in such a way that it captures agriculture's true contribution to the economy. Aid should also aim to build long-term, sustainable growth and improved rural livelihoods.

2009

Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, CEO of FANPRAN, on agriculture and climate change World Farmers• The ability of agriculture to adapt and withstand the impacts of climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. Climate change presents a very real threat to the livelihoods and food security for millions of people in developing countries. Yet, agriculture is also adding to the climate change problem. Current practices, including the conversion of forests and grasslands for crops and pasture, contribute some 31 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. A changing planet brings an unprecedented opportunity to turn around agriculture in developing countries, making it more sustainable, reducing its negative impacts on the global environment, and at the same time, enhancing food security. Agriculture & Rural Development Day (ARDD) is a one-day event on Saturday, 12 December 2009 at the Faculty of Life Sciences (LIFE) at the University of Copenhagen that will bring together approximately 300 policymakers, negotiators, rural development practitioners, producers, civil society and the agricultural and climate change scientific community, in order to build consensus on what has to be done to fully incorporate agriculture into the post-Copenhagen climate agenda, and to discuss a clear workplan of strategies and actions needed to address climate change adaptation and mitigation in the agriculture sector. Key issues that will be discussed at ARDD: Impact of climate change on development, poverty and food security Triple challenge of increasing food productivity, climate resilience and reducing emissions Unlocking the potential of emissions markets for smallholder farmers Innovations in the agricultural sector of relevance to the climate change agenda

Flagships for Youth Development

Regional Policy Dialogues on Youth in Agriculture

Under Dr. Sibanda's leadership, FANRPAN identified the youth as an important stakeholder group that is to be nurtured and included in agricultural policy processes as they are the future of African agriculture. This initiative was prompted by the realisation that 20 percent of the African population is between the ages of 15 and 24.

In 2011, Dr. Sibanda hosted the 2011 FANRPAN Annual High Level Regional Food Security Policy Dialogue in Swaziland under the theme “Advocating for the Active Engagement of the Youth in the Agricultural Value Chain” (http://dialogue2011.fanrpan.org/) with the view to getting insights into the unique role of the youth in agricultural modernisation, economy-wide transformation and social wellbeing. This dialogue resolved that, the youth in agriculture theme needed to be explored further and therefore, the 2012 Regional Policy Dialogue carried a similar theme “From Policy to Practice: Advocating for the Active Engagement of Youth in Agriculture Value Chains” (http://dialogue2012.fanrpan.org/).

Country Case Studies

Dr. Sibanda partnered with The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA) to conduct country case studies in Malawi, Mauritius, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. The case studies focused on “Current and Emerging Youth Policies and Initiatives with special link to Agriculture” (http://dialogue2012.fanrpan.org/country_case_studies).

As a follow-up to these, Dr. Sibanda has partnered with the United State Agency for International Development (USAID) to conduct similar studies in Angola, Mozambique, Lesotho and Zambia.

Youth in Agriculture Award

Dr. Sibanda launched the FANRPAN Youth in Agriculture Award at the 2012 FANRPAN Annual High Level Regional Food Security Policy Dialogue in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. The Award was received by Shambani Graduate Enterprise, whose founding member Mr. Victor Mfinanga is a 2008 Yara Award Prize for an African Green Revolution Winner (http://dialogue2012.fanrpan.org/newsroom/youth_in_agriculture_award_shambani_graduate_enterprise). Currently, Dr. Sibanda is scoping for youth in agriculture success stories in Lesotho.

YTouring Theatre Company

Dr. Sibanda is part of an advisory group to YTouring Theatre Company, a UK based company that engages young people on different topics using theatre. Dr. Sibanda recently delivered a speech on Food and Behaviour change to young people that will be writing scripts for the next Theatre of Debate.

Global Engagements

Dr Sibanda led a six member FANRPAN delegation to the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP 14/CMP 4 which was held in Poznan as part of the high level COMESA delegation representing the COMESA/FANRPAN Africa-wide Civil Society Climate Change Initiative for Policy Dialogues (ACCID). http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d00614/COMESA_Poznan_Press_Release.pdf

She was instrumental in the development of the Africa Solution which embraced Agriculture, Forestry and other Land Use. She managed, through FANRPAN, to develop a complement initiative to ensure the African Civil Society and government collaborate and speak with one voice in COP14 AND 15.

At COP 15 Dr Sibanda spearheaded the launch of the Agriculture and Rural Development Day, attended by more than 300 delegates in Copenhagen.

This conference drew together the advances made in 2008 and move from discussion to negotiation mode in 2009. This also saw the launch of the No Agriculture, No Deal campaign that has now gained speed within COP conferences. http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d00785/ / http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d00711/

Till now the event has provided a unifying platform for different constituencies and Agriculture Day is able to push forward to negotiators a strong message in favour of a work programme.

In Cancun, Mexico, Dr Sibanda delivered resolutions to over 300 delegates at the Agricultural Rural Development Day, and this paved the way for a holistic approach to a more vigorous and evidence based inclusion of agriculture in the high level discussions at COP17 in Durban. At the Durban conference she advocated for an equitable deal for Africa which led to agriculture being included in some discussions. http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01258/ / http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01056/

The discussions were mainly on the road after Copenhagen: priority strategies and actions for ensuring food security and rural development in the face of climate change, in which Dr Sibanda was an active participant from the planning stage.

She was also part of the event alongside the United Nations Sustainable Development Conference (Rio+20) in June 2012 which helped broaden the reach and reaffirm the centrality of agriculture and climate change to development. http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01339/ / http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01339/icsu/

Now that the climate change negotiations have evolved, the new Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day has the opportunity to continue to add value and help discussions progress by leveraging the cumulated expertise and knowledge that the organisers and event participants bring to the table. http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01186/

At COP 18 in Doha, Dr Sibanda led a group of experts, practitioners, civil society and researchers who gathered to discuss issues related to food security, climate change and rural development. This looked at progress made and the challenges ahead in terms of solutions, gaps and priorities for achieving food security in the face of climate change. http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01402/

News 2014

Planting the Seeds for Greater African Harvests

16 October 2014, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

She is the face of the African farmer: The hardworking woman with a child on her back, tilling the land with a hoe to harvest barely enough to feed her children, who she worries do not get enough to eat.It is a challenge recognized by both the 2014 Borlaug Dialogue International Symposium and this year's world food day theme "Family Farming: Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth" that calls for a renewed focus on family farming.

Culture, the albatross perpetuating stunting and malnutrition

13 Aug 2014, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Food, despite being the greatest opportunity for a healthy lifestyle, could become the greatest threat and cause of death, particularly across Africa.

Closing Africa's agricultural yield gap

5 August 2014, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Increasing agricultural productivity across Africa requires investing in both the technology and the services needed to reach smallholder farmers.

African smallholder farm families have lost the elasticity to bounce back!

15 May 2014, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Building resilience on Africa's small farms starts with people and investing in their capacity to bounce back after a shock. These shocks could be external, such as droughts and floods that wipe out an entire livestock herd or destroy a crop field. Or, they could mean loss of income and physical assets, many times due to unforeseen prolonged illness.

News 2013

Dr Sibanda wins the Yara Award: Important work, inspired choice

20 Aug 2013

For her excellent work in the field of youth development and empowerment, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) has been honored with the 2013 Yara Prize.

...nurtured and included in agricultural policy processes. She launched the FANRPAN Youth in Agriculture Award in 2012. Dr Sibanda was announced as co-winner...


http://africagreenmedia.co.za/dr-sibanda-wins-the-yara-award-important-work-inspired-choice/

Ikegwuonu Makes Nigeria Proud, Bags Yara Award for Agric Radio

20 Aug 2013

Nigeria's Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO, Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria has been recognized for his entrepreneurial work of using radio as transmitter of sustainable agricultural development and environmental conservation beneficial to rural poor small farmers in the Imo State.

...the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) also honoured for advocating for impact will receive their awards...


http://www.nigeriacommunicationsweek.com.ng/broadcasting/ikegwuonu-makes-nigeria-proud-bags-yara-award-for-agric-radio

The Yara Prize honors youth entrepreneurship and policy advocacy

19 Aug 2013

The Yara Prize 2013 is being awarded to Mr. Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN).

...and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy...


http://www.chron.com/business/press-releases/article/The-Yara-Prize-honors-youth-entrepreneurship-and-4743296.php

The Yara Prize picks youth entrepreneur, policy advocacy for 2013 award

19 Aug 2013

The Yara Prize 2013 has been awarded to Mr. Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN). CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN). The Yara Prize 2013 has been awarded to Mr. Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu


http://www.africasciencenews.org/en/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=919:the-yara-prize-picks-youth-entrepreneur-policy-advocacy-for-2013-award&catid=49:food&Itemid=113

Yara International ASA : The Yara Prize honors youth entrepreneurship and policy advocacy

19 Aug 2013

Oslo (2013-08-19): The Yara Prize 2013 is being awarded to Mr. Nnaemeka Ikegwuonu, founder and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN). ...and CEO of the Smallholders Foundation in Nigeria, and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy...


http://www.4-traders.com/YARA-INTERNATIONAL-ASA-1413319/news/Yara-International-ASA-The-Yara-Prize-honors-youth-entrepreneurship-and-policy-advocacy-17199692/

Real change in food security through innovation platforms, where science marries local know-how

Aug 2013

Women, although major contributors to agricultural production, are often left out of the development equation.“45% of households in Africa are led by women… Women are the source of 80% of food produced in countries stricken by famine and malnutrition… however less than 10% [of these] women can access financial resources for farming.”

Those were the words of Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, the keynote speaker at the side event called “Empowering women and youth for improved productivity and resilience of African Agriculture” at AASW6 organized by FARA. http://ypard.net/2013-july-29/tending-real-food-producers August

Real change in food security through innovation platforms, where science marries local know-how The change starts from those who are affected by the problem being around the table with those who want to experiment research and deliver options for development, sitting as equal partners. (Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda)

Science alone cannot help Africa feed itself. That was a strong message from Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food Agriculture and Natural Resource Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) at the recent Africa Agricultural Science Week (AASW) organised by the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), 15-19 July, 2013.


http://nilebdc.org/2013/08/12/aasw-lindiwe/

Tending to the real food producers

29 Jul 2013

Women, although major contributors to agricultural production, are often left out of the development equation.“45% of households in Africa are led by women… Women are the source of 80% of food produced in countries stricken by famine and malnutrition… however less than 10% [of these] women can access financial resources for farming.” Those were the words of Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, the keynote speaker at the side event called “Empowering women and youth for improved productivity and resilience of African Agriculture” at AASW6 organized by FARA. http://ypard.net/2013-july-29/tending-real-food-producers


http://ypard.net/2013-july-29/tending-real-food-producers

FANRPAN signs MoU with AATF at the AASW6!

July 2013

From 15 - 20 July 2013, all stakeholders involved in Agricultural Research for Development (ARD) from Africa and other regions were gathered in Accra, Ghana for the 6th Africa Agriculture Science week, organised by the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) and partners. This conference was an opportunity for stakeholders to meet, interact, share experiences and collaborate.


http://nawsheenh.blogspot.com/2013/07/fanrpan-signs-mou-with-aatf-at-aasw6.html

FANRPAN and AATF sign partnership agreement

24 July 2013

The challenges for agricultural development in Africa require concerted efforts to exploit the opportunities for scientific and technological revolution, which must be implemented to improve agricultural production and productivity on the continent.

It is recognition of this fact that the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF) have signed a cooperative agreement that seeks to foster collaboration and strengthen the working relationship between FANRPAN and AATF to accelerate Africa's quest to eradicate poverty, hunger and malnutrition and improve the general well-being of its people.

The agreement was signed by Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda (FANRPAN Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission) and Dr Denis T. Kyetere (AATF Executive Director) on 18 July 2013 in Accra, Ghana, on the sidelines of the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) 6th Africa Agriculture Science Week on the theme “Africa Feeding Africa through Agricultural Science and Innovation”.


http://www.fanrpan.org/documents/d01618/

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda and Monty Jones on closing the gaps in agricultural research for Africa's development

19 July 2013

Africa, Agriculture, Capacity Strengthening, Directorate, Event Report, ILRI, PA, Policy, Spotlight No Responses »

The second day of the ongoing (15-20 Jul 2013) sixth Africa Agriculture Science Week of the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), in Accra, Ghana, featured conversations on how to develop climate-smart agriculture, how to improve the resilience as well as productivity of Africa's smallholder farmers and how to make wider use of demonstrable successes in development of the continent's capacity for agricultural innovation.


http://www.ilri.org/ilrinews/

Insight thoughts from two women working in African agriculture

21 June 2013

Raising enough food to feed a burgeoning global population is a complex problem that requires the best minds and coordination of the public/private sector. There are couple interesting thoughts I'd like to share from two African women that work in agriculture.

The first is Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chief executive officer and head of mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network. I had the pleasure of hearing Dr Sibanda speak at the Chicago Symposium on Global Hunger in Washington DC in late May. She made the following points.


http://wp.next2.us/?page_id=42

Integrate science and society — Dr Sibanda tells US symposium

10 June 2013

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) calls for an increase in long-term, stable support and investment in fighting hunger.

Addressing the Chicago Council Global Food Security Symposium recently, Dr Sibanda says in order to allow countries and organisations to address the larger challenges of hunger, with a focus on capacity-building and solutions that attract young people to agriculture confidence is a necessity. She noted the difference between research for development and research in development – and the pronounced need for the latter. “Science and society must be better integrated to comprehensively address the challenges of food and agriculture.”


http://africagreenmedia.co.za/integrate-science-and-society-dr-sibanda-tells-us-symposium/

Commentary - A Social Innovation to Solve the African Food and Nutrition Paradox

31 May 2013

This post is part of a series produced by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, marking the occasion of its annual Global Food Security Symposium in Washington, D.C., which was held on May 21st. For more information on the symposium, click here. Follow @globalagdev and #globalag on twitter to join the conversation. Chief Executive, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

Sitting in the large auditorium at the 2013 Chicago Council symposium where I was participating for the first time, I saw a powerful force of change agents with a mission to achieve impact. Using its convening power and networks, the Chicago Council created an Independent Advisory Group on Global Agriculture Development, focusing on the power of science, trade and business to transform our sector.


http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-for-thought/2013/05/

Commentary - A Social Innovation to Solve the African Food and Nutrition Paradox

31 May 2013

This post is part of a series produced by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, marking the occasion of its annual Global Food Security Symposium in Washington, D.C., which was held on May 21st. For more information on the symposium, click here.

By Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Chief Executive, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

Sitting in the large auditorium at the 2013 Chicago Council symposium where I was participating for the first time, I saw a powerful force of change agents with a mission to achieve impact. Using its convening power and networks, the Chicago Council created an Independent Advisory Group on Global Agriculture Development, focusing on the power of science, trade and business to transform our sector.


http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-for-thought/2013/05/commentary-a-social-innovation-to-solve-the-african-food-and-nutrition-paradox.html

Strengthen women voices in agriculture

31 May 2013

Author: Michael Hoevel and Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Africa holds vast potential for growth yet is also home to over 200 million people who are chronically hungry.

As it is estimated that 80 percent of the population depends on agriculture for their livelihoods, it is fundamental that those in the farming sector are given the access to knowledge, finance, rural infrastructure, inputs and markets that they need to increase their production and productivity as a means of improving their food security, nutrition and incomes.


http://www.trust.org/item/20130530153850-43rzq/

Can market solutions unlock Africa's agricultural potential?

30 May 2013

Author: Michael Hoevel and Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Africa holds vast potential for growth yet is also home to over 200 million people who are chronically hungry.

As it is estimated that 80 percent of the population depends on agriculture for their livelihoods, it is fundamental that those in the farming sector are given the access to knowledge, finance, rural infrastructure, inputs and markets that they need to increase their production and productivity as a means of improving their food security, nutrition and incomes.


http://www.trust.org/item/20130530153850-43rzq/

Live Blog - Chicago Council: A Discussion on “A New Science of Agriculture to Advance Global Food Security”

21 May 2013

Danielle Nierenberg, co-founder, Food Tank

r. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, and Ren Wang, Assistant Director General of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), both advocated for an increase in long-term, stable support and investment. Dr. Sibanda stated that investors need the confidence to make the long-term investments necessary to allow countries and organizations to address the larger challenges of hunger, with a focus on capacity-building and solutions that attract young people to agriculture.


http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-for-thought/2013/05/live-blog-chicago-council-a-discussion-on-a-new-science-of-agriculture-to-advance-global-food-securi.html

Live Blog - Leveraging science for agriculture at the ground level

May 2013

By Keron Bascombe from Trinidad

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs hosted its Global Food Security Symposium on “Capitalizing the Power of Science, Trade and Business to End Hunger and Poverty”. The organizers have brought together numerous experts from around the world, all working towards hunger and poverty issues as sustainable change agents.

The first panel of this morning's event asked introductory questions of the esteemed members of the panel. The group consisted of Barbara Schaal, Brett Begemann, Cutberto Garza, Rob Horsch, Mauricio Antonio Lopes, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda and Ren Wang.The most memorable question was posed to Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda: “How should agri-research be adopted to aid smallholder farmers?”

Her answer began with the need for smallholder farmers to first define a goal for themselves; where do they see themselves in 10 years? This should lead initial engagement between scientists, researchers and producers. After this conclusion the next step is to identify what resources are available to farmers.


http://globalfoodforthought.typepad.com/global-food-for-thought/2013/05/live-blog-leveraging-science-for-agriculture-at-the-ground-level.html

Sustainable agricultural intensification: Tackling food insecurity in a resource-scarce world

19 April 2013

By Lindiwe Majele Sibanda and Katy Wilson.

AlertNet

ID-10029986 Today, the world is searching for solutions to a series of global challenges unprecedented in their scale and complexity. Food insecurity, malnutrition, climate change, rural poverty and environmental degradation are all among them.

A recent meeting hosted by the Irish government and the Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice (MRFCJ) in Dublin convened experts and practitioners from around the globe to discuss how the next iteration of development goals following the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) can respond to this set of challenges, as part of the so-called “post-2015” development agenda.


http://canwefeedtheworld.wordpress.com/2013/04/19/sustainable-agricultural-intensification-tackling-food-insecurity-in-a-resource-scarce-world/

New paradigm for African agriculture sees sustainable intensification in a new light

18 April 2013

The new report from the Montpellier Panel – a panel of international experts led by Professor Sir Gordon Conway of Agriculture for Impact – provides innovative thinking and examples into the way in which the techniques of sustainable intensification are being used by smallholder farmers in Africa to address the continent's food and nutrition crisis.


http://www.iied.org/new-paradigm-for-african-agriculture-sees-sustainable-intensification-new-light

Sustainable intensification 'can work for African farmers'

18 April 2013

Smallholder farmers in Africa must participate in research to ensure higher crop yields and to fend off hunger as the continent's population grows, according to a report published today.

A combination of traditional knowledge and modern science will be key to achieving higher productivity at lower ecological cost — known as 'sustainable intensification' — the report says.

Along with the other members of the Montpellier Panel, she believes that to improve communication between international researchers and local smallholders, the best solution is to visit affected communities, spend time in villages and fields, and to listen and learn.

"Scientific knowledge can be obtained anywhere — globally or locally," says Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chief executive of the South African Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and fellow panel member. "But any science must be adapted to local conditions, and policies must be put in place to support implementation."

Majele Sibanda cites the water pockets technique known as zai, pioneered by farmers in Burkina Faso, as an example of a traditional practice recognised by modern science. Farmers dig holes — or zais — across the fields during the dry season, and fill them with manure to attract termites. The termites then create an extensive network of underground tunnels beneath the holes and bring up nutrients from the deeper soils.


http://www.scidev.net/global/sustainability/news/sustainable-intensification-can-work-for-african-farmers-.html

World Economic Forum on Africa

25 February 2013

Cape Town 05 May11 – Strive Masiyiwa, Group Executive Chairman, Econet Wireless group, South Africa, and Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief executive Officer and Head of Mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), South Africa, during the Development Partnerships plenary at the World Economic Forum on Africa 2011 held in Cape Town, South Africa, 4-6 May 2011.


http://africanbrew.com/2013/02/25/five-lessons-from-zimbabwes-richest-man-strive-masiyiwa/world-economic-forum-on-africa-2011/

Strengthen women voices in agriculture

23 May 2013

Integrate science and society — Zimbabwean food policy expert at Chicago Council symposium 23 May 2013 Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, appointed chair of ILRI's board of trustees in November 2012 Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO and head of mission of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), based in South Africa, is chair of ILRI's board of trustees (photo credit: Lindiwe Majele Sibanda). At the ongoing Chicago Council Global Food Security Symposium, 'there is renewed focus across public, private, and international organizations towards ending global food insecurity. . . . [S]peakers stressed that the complex challenge of hunger requires a unique collaboration between different sectors, experts, and communities. . . .


http://clippings.ilri.org/2013/05/23/integrate-science-and-society-zimbabwean-food-policy-expert-at-chicago-council-symposium/

News 2012

What women want from Doha

December 2012

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of Food Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Advocacy Network and spokesperson for global agriculture coalition Farming First

Women are the fountain of life. They are mothers, innovators, educators, farmers and custodians of the environment, particularly rural women.


http://www.stakeholderforum.org/sf/outreach/index.php/component/content/article?id=1117

We Want Agriculture to be part of the deal we are getting out of Qatar

4 December 2012

Agriculture experts and advocates at the ongoing climate change negotiations in Qatar are blaming political leaders whose responsibility it's to ensure food security for their citizens for failing to ensure that agriculture is a major topic at the talks.

Chief Executive Officer of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is concerned that political leaders particularly from Africa are ignoring agriculture which is the mainstay of their economies.

The talks are mainly centering on how developed countries could reduce their carbon emissions and the money they need to pay developing countries to protect the environment through things like planting trees and using clean energy.

Women are the fountain of life. They are mothers, innovators, educators, farmers and custodians of the environment, particularly rural women.


http://www.simba.fm/2012/12/04/we-want-agriculture-to-be-part-of-the-deal-we-are-getting-out-of-qatar/

Submission on Agriculture to SBSTA by the Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

December 2012

The submission was jointly prepared and endorsed by FANRPAN and Mary Robinson Foundation- Climate Justice (MRFCJ). Submitted by: Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda UNFCCC Designated Contact Person FANRPAN


http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2012/smsn/ngo/191.pdf

Doha: Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day 5

December 2012

Doha, Qatar. “No agriculture, no deal” was the mantra coming out the fifth Agriculture, Landscapes, and Livelihoods (ALL, formerly Agriculture and Rural Development) Day on Monday. Yet it appears as though the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) will not make any sort of recommendation regarding agriculture to the UNFCCC at COP18, due to difficulties in reaching consensus. And while according to Mahmoud Sohl (ICARDA), one of the speakers on the high level panel at ALL Day, “if they don't put agriculture on the agenda, then they are not serious” about dealing with climate change, clearly participants at this year's ALL Day felt strongly that agriculture needed to be part of the solution to climate change.


http://paepard.blogspot.com/2012/12/doha-agriculture-landscapes-and.html

Doha: Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day 5

December 2012

Doha, Qatar. “No agriculture, no deal” was the mantra coming out the fifth Agriculture, Landscapes, and Livelihoods (ALL, formerly Agriculture and Rural Development) Day on Monday. Yet it appears as though the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) will not make any sort of recommendation regarding agriculture to the UNFCCC at COP18, due to difficulties in reaching consensus. And while according to Mahmoud Sohl (ICARDA), one of the speakers on the high level panel at ALL Day, “if they don't put agriculture on the agenda, then they are not serious” about dealing with climate change, clearly participants at this year's ALL Day felt strongly that agriculture needed to be part of the solution to climate change.


http://paepard.blogspot.com/2012/12/doha-agriculture-landscapes-and.html

A Voice for Agriculture

5 December 2012

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda giving the opening address at Agriculture, Landscapes, and Livelihoods Day.

“No agriculture, no deal” was the mantra coming out the fifth Agriculture, Landscapes, and Livelihoods (ALL, formerly Agriculture and Rural Development) Day on Monday. Yet it appears as though the Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) will not make any sort of recommendation regarding agriculture to the UNFCCC at COP18, due to difficulties in reaching consensus. And while according to Mahmoud Sohl (ICARDA), one of the speakers on the high level panel at ALL Day, “if they don't put agriculture on the agenda, then they are not serious” about dealing with climate change, clearly participants at this year's ALL Day felt strongly that agriculture needed to be part of the solution to climate change.


http://blog.ecoagriculture.org/2012/12/05/all5/

Climate change must be women centered

27 Novemeber 2012

Climate change is a complex, multifaceted problem and it hits the poorest countries and especially women hardest, Mary Robinson, President of the Mary Robinson Foundation Climate Justice (MRFCJ) says.


http://www.thezimbabwean.co/life/environment/62428/climate-change-must-be-women.html

Achieving Food Security In Africa - This Was Two Years Ago. Question Is What Has Changed For The Better?

21 Novemeber 2012

A committed effort in every agricultural sector and discipline will reap real benefits for the continent, said Lindiwe Majele Sibanda on Wednesday, 25 August 201.

Over 200 farmers, policymakers, agricultural researchers, agrodealers and non-governmental organisations from across Africa and around the world gathered in Namibia for the annual FANRPAN Policy Dialogue to discuss the state of food security in sub-Saharan Africa and future priorities for continuing progress.

Food security on the continent is still only a goal; the reality is that agricultural growth has been erratic, leaving one third of the African population chronically malnourished.


http://honourabledavidlamptey.webs.com/apps/blog/

The Two Faces of Africa

6 Novemeber 2012

It can be argued that there are two faces of Africa. The first is the Africa as perceived by the Western world. This perception is largely erroneous and divorced from reality.

To Africans, this is a largely mythical Africa, dominated by images of starving children, drought and genocide. One of the goals should be to change the perception of Africa being a poverty-stricken, war-torn continent to that of a proud, self-sufficient and prospering one.

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is the CEO of FANRPAN, the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network and a trustee of CIMMYT (The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center).


http://www.hunger-undernutrition.org/blog/farming/page/2/

FANRPAN honours top agriculturists

9 October 2012

The 2012 Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) Multi-Stakeholders Dialogue successfully concluded in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania with delegates thanking organizers for the job well done.

The annual policy and stakeholder consultations held from September 1- 7, 2012, discussed practical approaches to ensure food and natural resources security in the continent. FANRPAN Chief Executive Officer, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda at thanked various delegates for attending the meeting.


http://www.agriculture.com/crops/organic-farming/frp-honours-top-agriculturists_169-ar26270

Educate Farmers on Climate Change

23 September 2012

EXPERTS in environmental studies are advising journalists and technocrats in agriculture to educate society on the impending consequences of major climate change.

According to Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chef executive officer (CEO) of the Food, Agriculture & Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), it is important to understand which plant, which fertilizer – coupled with the lever of carbon emissions – could impact upon the air and land.

In the event, Dr Sibanda advises that African countries move away from the stereotype of traditional agriculture that many people are accustomed to.

“It is important to know that land is adaptable to new changes,” she noted.


http://www.businesstimes.co.tz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2070:educate-farmers-on-climate-change&catid=1:latest-news&Itemid=57

Educate Farmers on Climate Change

23 September 2012

EXPERTS in environmental studies are advising journalists and technocrats in agriculture to educate society on the impending consequences of major climate change.

According to Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chef executive officer (CEO) of the Food, Agriculture & Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), it is important to understand which plant, which fertilizer – coupled with the lever of carbon emissions – could impact upon the air and land.

In the event, Dr Sibanda advises that African countries move away from the stereotype of traditional agriculture that many people are accustomed to.

“It is important to know that land is adaptable to new changes,” she noted.


http://www.businesstimes.co.tz/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2070:educate-farmers-on-climate-change&catid=1:latest-news&Itemid=57

Women in African agriculture: Farmers, Mothers, Innovators and Educators

18 September 2012

The droughts in the US and Russia and their impact on harvests have dominated the news in the last few weeks. And with the latest USDA announcement that the US maize crop would be the smallest in six years and the soybean crop the smallest in nine years, there is media speculation about the future impact on global food prices. The food price spikes of 2007/08 and 2010 have shown us that national and regional risks can have global implications.

Women farmers contribute up to 50% of labour on farms in sub-Saharan Africa.

But for smallholder farmers in Africa – at least half of whom are women – droughts are but one of the many hurdles that they may need to overcome in the course of each agricultural cycle.

In a new briefing paper by Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda launched in a UK parliament meeting hosted by Heidi Alexander MP on 17th September, 'Women in African agriculture: farmers, mothers, innovators and educators', the international Montpellier Panel call for urgent and transformative action to address the needs and perspectives of women in smallholder agricultural policy in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper shows that women play crucial roles that often span the entire value chain: as farmers and businesswomen in smallholder agricultural production, as mothers managing household nutrition, and as innovators and educators.


http://ag4impact.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/women-in-african-agriculture-farmers-mothers-innovators-and-educators/

Women in African agriculture: Farmers, Mothers, Innovators and Educators

18 September 2012

The droughts in the US and Russia and their impact on harvests have dominated the news in the last few weeks. And with the latest USDA announcement that the US maize crop would be the smallest in six years and the soybean crop the smallest in nine years, there is media speculation about the future impact on global food prices. The food price spikes of 2007/08 and 2010 have shown us that national and regional risks can have global implications.

Women farmers contribute up to 50% of labour on farms in sub-Saharan Africa.

But for smallholder farmers in Africa – at least half of whom are women – droughts are but one of the many hurdles that they may need to overcome in the course of each agricultural cycle.

In a new briefing paper by Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda launched in a UK parliament meeting hosted by Heidi Alexander MP on 17th September, 'Women in African agriculture: farmers, mothers, innovators and educators', the international Montpellier Panel call for urgent and transformative action to address the needs and perspectives of women in smallholder agricultural policy in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper shows that women play crucial roles that often span the entire value chain: as farmers and businesswomen in smallholder agricultural production, as mothers managing household nutrition, and as innovators and educators.


http://ag4impact.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/women-in-african-agriculture-farmers-mothers-innovators-and-educators/

Farming First Newsletter

August 2012

The much-anticipated Rio+20 Summit took place in June. Farming First focused on building momentum around the role of agriculture in a green economy with a number of side-events at the negotiation site as well as partnering to organise the fourth annual Agriculture and Rural Development Day. Aside from Rio, Farming First continues to promote sustainable agriculture and food security, with presence at key events and in global media.


http://www.farmingfirst.org/newsletter/2012/08/

Put Farming First

16 August 2012

The increasing emphasis on subsistence farming has led to several contradictory trends in the last 10 years.

First, a decline in global commodity trading. Second, the development of sustainable agriculture.

Third, a global land grab by cash rich countries. Fourth, increasing pressure on water resources.


http://jkelvynrichards.blogspot.com/2012/08/put-farming-first.html

Asking the experts: connecting smallholders to markets in southern Africa

10 July 2012

How can we connect asset-poor smallholders to markets in southern Africa? And what are the respective roles of civil society, governments, and big business to achieve this?

These were some of the questions considered by agricultural development practitioners from six different southern Africa countries at a regional workshop on 9th July in Johannesburg, South Africa. The event was the first in a series of three regional workshops organised by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), and Agriculture for Impact (A4I) at Imperial College London.


http://ag4impact.wordpress.com/2012/07/10/asking-the-experts-connecting-smallholders-to-markets-in-southern-africa/

Feeding the World: Sustainable agriculture and innovation Organized by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

17 June 2012

In this side event, moderated by Christina Negra, Coordinator of the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change, the panel addressed the contribution of sustainable agricultural intensification to agricultural productivity and resilience, and how this contribution can be estimated and tracked.

Claudia Ringler, IFPRI, stated that, worldwide, there are a billion people that lack food security due to rising or fluctuating food prices. On the drivers of food demand, she highlighted population growth, which will reach 9 billion by 2050, urbanization, income growth, and biofuels and bioenergy. Ringler stressed the need for investment in agricultural research and policy reforms, and called for improved management practices and governance.

On the agricultural challenges of Africa, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), highlighted the relevance of technology tailored to diverse local conditions in Africa and women's role as the backbone of agriculture. Emphasizing the need to evaluate the role of women in the value chain, Sibanda urged political leadership that will change policies to create a level playing field for farmers worldwide.


http://www.iisd.ca/uncsd/rio20/enbots/pdf/enbots2738e.pdf

Notable Food Security Quotes From The Rio+20 And G20 Conferences

22 June 2012

Heads of state, UN officials, private sector and civil society leaders discussed numerous sustainable development issues at the Rio+20 Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and at the G20 Conference in Los Cabos, Mexico this week. Many of these leaders recognized that agriculture unites the diverse efforts to create the “Future We Want” and meet the needs of a world population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050. Below are their comments on the challenges facing the world, the solutions that agriculture and sustainable development provide, and the actions needed to implement the resolutions of the Rio+20 Outcome Document.

“Rio+20 negotiators must make explicit the link between food security and sustainable development as well as steps needed to ensure farmers, especially smallholders, have dignified livelihoods, can feed their families and have money in their pockets. For this to happen they require conducive policy environments that enable them access to markets and appropriate technology.”

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive of the South Africa-­based Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)


http://www.globalharvestinitiative.org/index.php/2012/06/notable-food-security-quotes-from-the-rio20-and-g20-conferences/

Agricultural technologies for food security, or something more?

20 June 2012

Boosting food production requires investment in technology: but supportive policies are needed for good results.

In a world that is becoming increasingly food-insecure, due to population growth, climate change, volatile food prices, unequal food access, and inefficient supply chains, what solutions exist to feed 9 billion people by the year 2050?

The problem we face is by its nature very complex, so it stands to reason that solutions will need to address a range of issues, often several at once. Where do we begin?

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) shared her perspectives from working in African agriculture.

She highlighted the need for technology investments in both global and local research. Unless global technologies are tailored to local conditions, then these interventions will fail achieve the desired transformations. She also stressed that rural women, who are already bear a disproportionally heavy work burden, must not be put at further disadvantage by practices that are labour-intensive.


http://ccafs.cgiar.org/fr/blog/agricultural-technologies-food-security-or-something-more

Women farmers take centre stage in policy development

May 2012

In December 2011, researchers from Malawi's Bunda College of Agriculture presented findings from a study of the country's agriculture support systems to the media, civil society leaders and decision-makers. They recounted a story of frustration and disappointment with various government initiatives, including distribution of agricultural inputs, credit schemes and technologies. What made their findings remarkable, however, was that they were not generated by research questionnaires but through community theatre.

Theatre for Policy Advocacy (TPA) is at the heart of a pilot project that aims to strengthen the capacity of women farmers in Malawi and Mozambique to influence agricultural policy development. "The power of the TPA methodology lies in the fact that, in rural Africa, a theatrical performance is a major social event," explains Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of FANRPAN, the African policy research and advocacy network that has been implementing the Women Accessing Realigned Markets (WARM) project. "TPA performances are conducted in the open air, under trees or on the sports grounds of schools and hundreds of people from all walks of life attend."


http://tt.persiangulfswimmer.com/surf.aspx?dec=1&url=uh4QwdELmTxTxOVKtrwJsqwKuqVCvOZBv8ZAtrtBvgZMvqpKxhlLtgpS5r4Bv5VMuha/snQO093RB6X

G8 leaders urged to live up to nutrition commitments

15 May 2012

G8 leaders urged to live up to nutrition commitments

As part of their focus on global health and food security this year, G8 leaders will discuss a global partnership made under the L'Aquila Food Security Initiative (AFSI) in 2009 with food security a prominent feature in this year's G8 Summit.

At the 2009 AFSI meeting, leaders pledged to partner with global governments to improve agriculture and bolster food security through $22 billion worth of new investments, over three years, towards a comprehensive strategy focused on sustainable agriculture development.

…………'Engaging with African heads of state could be an important opportunity for G8 leaders to establish a broader set of solutions and make the global partnerships formed under the L'Aquila Food Security Initiative more productive and enable mutual accountability' said Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.


http://www.farminguk.com/news/G8-leaders-urged-to-live-up-to-nutrition-commitments_23529.html

Investing in Food for Africa – And the Rest of Us

17 May 2012

How fast is interest in Africa's ability to produce food moving up the political agenda? Have a look at the speaker line-up for this Friday's big agriculture and food security meeting in Washington, on the eve of the G8 summit of leaders of the world's biggest economies.

President Barack Obama will be there. So will Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the presidents or prime ministers of Tanzania, Ethiopia and Ghana, and the heads of big banks, commodity exchanges, aggregated companies and United Nations agencies.

Why the interest? Because there's good evidence the world is going to need at least 70 percent more food by 2050 to cope with population growth, changing appetites, demand for biofuel and other pressures on the food supply. And a good share of that extra food needs to come from Africa, which has the largest amount of under-used agricultural land in the world and the biggest potential to boost harvests.

“The whole world needs more food, and the belief is that food will come mainly from developing countries.”

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, head of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network and a spokesperson for the Farming First Coalition.

With the right kind of long-term investment, Africa could triple the amount of food it produces, experts say, helping improve not only it's own fragile food security but the world's.

“That's what's putting this on the global agenda,” says Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, head of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), based in southern Africa.


http://www.impatientoptimists.org/Posts/2012/05/Can-Africa-Feed-the-World

FANRPAN 2012 Partners' Meeting

31 May 2012

On 31 May FANRPAN held their 2012 Partners' Meeting at the CSIR

International Convention Centre, Pretoria. This is an annual event, which presents an opportunity for the organization to share their current programs, and future plans with existing and prospective partners. The convener of the meeting was the Chairman of the FANRPAN Board of Governors, Hon. Sindiso Ngwenya, current Secretary-General of COMESA.


http://www.croplifeafrica.org/uploads/File/forms/communication/newsletter/2012/newsletter_june_2012.pdf

FANRPAN 2012 Partners' Meeting

February 2012

What promise will Rio herald for agriculture?” A conversation with Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

s the international community prepares for Rio+20 in June 2012, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANPRAN), will speak with Naga Munchetty, international journalist and television presenter, on the prospects for elevating the role of agriculture in the climate talks. Dr Sibanda will present her views on what global policy and investment changes are needed to ensure that smallholder farmers in developing countries can play a central role in meeting the multiple challenges of increasing their production to ensure food security while preserving the natural environment and coping with the effects of climate change.


http://agrariancrisis.in/2012/02/20/sustainable-smallholder-agriculture-feeding-the-world-protecting-the-planet/

ECDPM visit to South Africa, February 2012

27 February 2012

On February 20th a delegation of the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM) visited the Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) in Pretoria, South Africa. After meeting with Chairperson Sindiso Ngwenya (COMESA Secretary General) and other members of the Board, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of FANRPAN, and Dr. Paul G.H. Engel, Director of ECDPM, proceeded to sign the Memorandum of Agreement that launches the collaboration and joint activities between the two organisations on regional integration, agriculture, markets and food security in Africa, with a focus on the CAADP processes.


http://southafrica.nlembassy.org/news/2012/02/ecdpm-visit.html

Wanted: Climate-Smart Agriculture

25 February 2012

As the links between food security and climate change become increasingly inextricable, the necessity for sustainable agriculture is now a universal concern.

Smallholder farmers in the global South - who suffer most from changes in climate patterns and the degradation of natural resources, since they live and work in the most vulnerable landscapes – are in urgent need of sustainable agricultural technologies, a reality that was recognized at the annual meeting of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), which drew to a close in Rome on Thursday

"One thing people need to understand is climate-smart agriculture," said Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN).

"We have the imperative to feed more mouths so we need to intensify our food production systems but this has got to be done in a sustainable way."

According to Sibanda, farmers and agricultural systems must adapt in order to mitigate the destabilizing impacts of climate change.


http://www.nationofchange.org/wanted-climate-smart-agriculture-1330187858

What Will Rio offer for Agriculture?

22 February 2012

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda of FANRPAN, introducing herself as the daughter of tomato farmers, this afternoon inspired IFAD's governors and attendees with her compelling call to put farmers first to allow them to produce food sustainably to feed a growing urban population.


http://ifad-un.blogspot.com/2012/02/what-will-rio-herald-for-agriculture.html

More food for everyone

20 February 2012

Rwanda's Paul Kagame and Bill Gates to attend IFAD annual meeting

Rome, 20 February 2012 – Development leaders, and heads of state and government will congregate in Rome for the 35th session of the Governing Council, the annual meeting of the highest decision-making body of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). Mario Monti, Prime Minister of the Republic of Italy, Paul Kagame, President of the Republic of Rwanda, and Joseph Boakai, Vice President of the Republic of Liberia will be keynote speakers at the 22-23 February meeting attended by representatives of IFAD's 167 Member States.

…………….. Leaders speaking at the Governing Council will remind donors and governments about the importance of a strong agricultural sector to secure global food supplies in the face of climate change and a rapidly growing population. Participants in the meeting's panel discussions will include academicians, scientists and policymakers such as Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, the Chief Executive Officer of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network and Akinwunmi Ayo Adesina, Minister of Agriculture of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.


http://www.ifad.org/media/press/2012/7.htm

Africa's civil society organisations (CSOs) have added their voice and endorsed the African Climate Solution as a model for a better future after 2012

February 2012

All members of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) have signed a declaration calling for the post Kyoto treaty to “include agriculture, sustainable land management, sustainable forest management, afforestation, reforestation reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation." This declaration is now also supported by The East African Community (EAC) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC)

Lead advocate for CSOs, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, speaking at the launch, underlined the importance of global carbon market in transforming Africa's agriculture and economies. "We are saying the carbon markets must reward our resource-poor farmers for contributing to efforts towards mitigating the effects of climate change,” said Dr. Sibanda, who is also CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), based in South Africa.

Africa has spoken with one voice on its readiness to join hands with the international community in securing a cleaner and sustainable planet for current and future generations. The time for that action is now. - Dr Sibanda


www.vkii.org

News 2011

Namibia Dialogue newsletter

12 December 2011

Namibia Dialogue newsletter


http://www.ips.org/africa/library/FANRPAN-newsletter-2010-SML.pdf

Climate change call to action issued at agriculture

12 December 2011

Climate change call to action issued at agriculture and rural development day in Durban

The city of Durban played host to this year's annual Agriculture and Rural Development Day on Saturday 3rd December in parallel with the COP17 climate change negotiations. Hosted by 17 leading agricultural organisations, the all-day event brought together more than 500 agricultural experts, including policymakers and negotiators, journalists, farmers and scientists to discuss priorities to boost agricultural production while supporting adaptation and mitigation to climate change.

The day saw the agricultural sector unite to raise its voice within the broader debates of the climate change negotiations as 19 of the world's leading agricultural organisations jointly endorsed a letter calling on COP17 negotiators to take concrete action and include agriculture in the text of the climate agreement. These groups include three United Nations agencies, the World Bank, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), FANRPAN, Farming First, the Global Forum on Agricultural Research, the Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions (SACAU) and the World Farmers' Organisation.

………………A number of key learning events took place during the day, which looked at the successes in agricultural adaptation and mitigation. Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), opened a side event which focussed on methods for building the resilience of African smallholder farmers in a changing climate.


http://rashtriyalokdal.com/2011-12-22-08-55-23/agriculture-news/135-agriculture-news-dec-13

Putting Agriculture on the Agenda at the COP17 Climate Negotiations in Durban

5 December 2011

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) as saying: “A Durban deal that approves a dedicated work program for agriculture will help farmers access farming technologies to modernize African agriculture and pave the way for a climate-smart green revolution.


http://www.glasshousepartnership.com/blog/putting-agriculture-on-the-agenda-at-the-cop17-climate-negotiations-in-durban/

Leading Agricultural Organisations Issue Joint Appeal to COP17

3 December 2011

Announcement highlights the need for long-term investment and support for improved food security, farmer resilience and climate mitigation efforts in agriculture

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive of the South Africa-based Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), adds, “With a united voice, African farmers have joined their counterparts around the world to put agriculture on the climate agenda. They are calling on negotiators to unlock the continent's agricultural potential to increase food productivity while helping them build resilience against the impacts of climate change.”


http://www.digitalsensenews.com.ng/DSBNews/243252/2011/12/fanrpan-boss-urges-african-negotiators-to-clamour-for-responsible-climate-deal

Agriculture Orgs Up Pressure Ahead of Durban Climate Talks

28 November 2011

“A Durban deal that approves a dedicated work program for agriculture will help farmers access farming technologies to modernize African agriculture and pave the way for a climate-smart green revolution,” Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, CEO of Mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network said.

“The outcomes of Cancun-COP16 and Copenhagen-COP15 were a big disappointment to the agricultural sector. For CoP17 we have a specific ask,” FANRPAN's Dr. Sibanda said.


http://blogs.wsj.com/source/2011/11/28/agriculture-orgs-up-pressure-ahead-of-durban-climate-talks/

Her majesty the queen mother receives food security policy leadership award

September 2011

Her Majesty The Queen Mother did the nation proud when she received the FANRPAN's Food Security Policy Leadership Award 2011 in honour of her strides in agriculture and food security issues. The award was given during the Food, Agricultural and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network's (FANRPAN) annual awards of excellence in agriculture. The event was part of the FANRPAN's 2011 High Level Food Security Policy Dialogue hosted by Swaziland and held at the Royal Swazi Sun's Convention Centre. This award is given to any leader who has worked hard in fighting poverty, ensuring food security, humanitarian issues and others.


http://www.gov.sz/her%20majesty%20the%20queen%20mother%20recieves%20food%20security%20policy%20leadership%20award.pdf

Africa expects deal on agriculture at COP 17

28 September 2011

African negotiators at the upcoming COP 17 in Durban should push for a binding and responsible climate deal on agriculture.

Addressing reporters in Pretoria about her organisation's call, 'no agriculture, no deal' for COP 17, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) CEO, Dr Lindiwe Sibanda said: "We are grateful that COP 17 is taking place in the African continent. Now we want African negotiators to come out of this gathering with a responsible, binding climate change deal on agriculture.


http://www.skillsportal.co.za/page/features/1042100-Africa-expects-deal-on-agriculture-at-COP-17#.UgsTsNKouSo

Focus on the youth at agricultural dialogue in swaziland

15 September 2011

Engaging the youth in future agricultural developments in Africa will take centre stage at the Food, Agricultural and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network's (FANRPAN) annual regional food security policy dialogue in Swaziland next week.

“The time is now to ensure that the youth are part of decisions about the future of agriculture in Africa – they are after all the generation that will have to ensure that the continent's growing population is fed,” says FANRPAN Chief Executive Officer Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.


http://www.junxioncommunications.co.za/releases/2011_09_15b.pdf

Engaging the youth in future agricultural developments

September 2011

Engaging the youth in future agricultural developments in Africa will take centre stage at Food, Agricultural and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) Annual Regional Food Security Policy Dialogue in Swaziland.

“The time is now to ensure that the youth are part of decisions about the future of agriculture in Africa – they are after all the generation that will have to ensure that the continent's growing population is fed,” says FANRPAN Chief Executive Officer Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.


http://www.future-agricultures.org/other-news/7632-event-focus-on-the-youth-at-fanrpan-annual-regional-food-security-policy-dialogue-in-swaziland-19-23-sept#.UgtO3dKouSo

Data visualization tool: The Story of Agriculture and the Green Economy

4 June 2011

"Economic development in Africa is inextricably linked to agriculture. As African leaders prepare to meet their G8 counterparts next week, I urge them to recognise the true contribution which Africa's farmers can provide to the continent's future growth." Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN).


http://www.donorplatform.org/publications/latest-publications/354-data-visualization-tool-the-story-of-agriculture-and-the-green-economy.html

The story of agriculture and the green economy

May 2011

Using data from leading research organisations, the Farming First coalition has launched an online infographic called The story of agriculture and the green economy, to show how agriculture in Africa could contribute to pro-poor economic growth, reduce poverty and food insecurity and help vulnerable people adapt to climate change.

The infographic aims to help inform G8 and G20 leaders to target investments and encourage policies that would contribute most effectively to achieving this. "We need to make the global economy green," begins the infographic. "Agriculture provides significant opportunities for growth, investment and jobs to help make this happen."

"Economic development in Africa is inextricably linked to agriculture," explains Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chief executive of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN). "As African leaders prepare to meet their G8 counterparts, I urge them to recognise the true contribution which Africa's farmers can provide to the continent's future growth." Howard Minigh, CEO and president of CropLife International concurs: "G8 leaders should foster policy coherence on food security and price volatility, and take actions that make agriculture a driver for poverty reduction by ensuring policies link producers to markets and enable value to be created throughout the supply chain to help create income opportunities and diversify rural activities."


http://www.new-ag.info/en/news/newsitem.php?a=2044

Women are central to feeding Africa

12 April 2011

In developing countries, more than 60% of women are directly involved in agricultural work, but very few gain access to information, training or supplies. More action and less rhetoric on this issue could put more food on the world's table and help drive economic growth, writes Pamela Whitby.

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda has agriculture in her blood. One of five children, she grew up on a farm in Zimbabwe where her parents still live and farm today.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-13049176

Women Farmers: Voiceless Pillars of African Agriculture

8 March 2011

As we mark the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day, a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future, it is unfortunate that it is only those women who enjoy a space and platform in academics, science, economics and politics who are celebrated and yet in Africa there is a deserving group of extraordinary women who still have no voice – the African women farmers.


http://www.nepad.org/foodsecurity/news/2103/women-farmers-voiceless-pillars-african-agriculture

Women Farmers: Voiceless Pillars of African Agriculture

8 March 2011

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)

As we mark the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day, a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future, it is unfortunate that it is only those women who enjoy a space and platform in academics, science, economics and politics who are celebrated and yet in Africa there is a deserving group of extraordinary women who still have no voice - the African women farmers.


http://www.caadp.net/news/?m=201103

What promise will Rio herald for agriculture?” A conversation with Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

22 February 2011

As the international community prepares for Rio+20 in June 2012, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANPRAN), will speak with Naga Munchetty, international journalist and television presenter, on the prospects for elevating the role of agriculture in the climate talks. Dr Sibanda will present her views on what global policy and investment changes are needed to ensure that smallholder farmers in developing countries can play a central role in meeting the multiple challenges of increasing their production to ensure food security while preserving the natural environment and coping with the effects of climate change.


www.ifad.org/events/gc/35/panel.htm

News 2010

Europe should increase aid to improve agriculture in Africa

5 December 2010

CANCÚN, Mexico, Dec 5 2010 (IPS) Farmers in Malawi, have more than doubled their maize harvests when growing their crops under a canopy of trees. Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, the chief executive officer of Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, said African countries need to work out strategies that will take into consideration the livelihoods of rural communities.

Adapting African agriculture

“The challenge is that in Africa, we thought only of science and technology as a way of adaptation to climate change,” said Sibanda.


http://www.ipsnews.net/2010/12/climate-change-turning-agriculture-from-problem-to-solution/

Broad coalition gathers to open the door for agriculture in international climate change negotiations

3 December 2010

Not content to see farming remain outside the international climate change negotiations under way in Mexico, a broad coalition of 17 organizations will bring together more than 400 policy makers, farmers, scientists, business leaders and development specialists on Saturday, December 4 to define steps for opening the door to agriculture within the next six months, permitting its full inclusion in both national action plans as well as the global climate agenda.

"Sub-Saharan Africa is among the regions that will be hardest hit by climate change," said Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and Farming First spokesperson. "Unless action is taken now to help farmers respond, the impacts of climate change could derail the region's revitalized efforts to transform the agricultural sector and deflate the optimism this has created about a uniquely African 'Green and Rainbow' Revolution."


http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-12/bc-bcg120210.php

Agriculture's greenhouse gas emissions and vulnerability to climate change impacts are far too big to ignore, say scientists

2 December 2010

Not content to see farming remain outside the international climate change negotiations under way in Mexico, a broad coalition of 17 organizations will bring together more than 400 policy makers, farmers, scientists, business leaders and development specialists on Saturday, December 4 to define steps for opening the door to agriculture within the next six months, permitting its full inclusion in both national action plans as well as the global climate agenda.


http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-12/bc-bcg120210.php

Plans launched for strategic grain reserves to serve EA

26 November 2010

Nairobi: Regional farmers hard hit by low return on investment due to price volatility and inefficient market systems are planning for a common strategic grain reserve (SGR) to help curb the situation that threatens to worsen food insecurity in East Africa. 'We are looking up to having a strategic grain reserve for the region so that we can have stable trading platforms that allow for planning and proper price setting based on the fundamentals of demand and supply,' East African Farmers Federation (EAFF) president Phillip Kirori said.

'Today, European aid to Africa can be especially productive because it can support emerging strategies already owned, operated and driven by Africans, which is a relatively novel situation in the history of European-African relations,' Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO and head of diplomatic mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) said


http://www.trademarksa.org/news/plans-launched-strategic-grain-reserves-serve-ea

Europe should increase aid to improve agriculture in Africa

26 October 2010, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda and Sir Gordon Conway

Here's a quick quiz to test your knowledge of farming and food production in sub-Saharan Africa. Which scenario best reflects the state of farming in Africa today?

  • convoys of food trucks besieged by starving masses in Niger
  • millions of smallholder farmers struggling to subsist without access to the tools and technologies they need
  • fields in Uganda plump with orange fleshed sweet potatoes rich in vitamin A growing so fast farmers can cultivate two plantings a year
  • solar powered weather stations in northern Kenya that automatically send insurance payments to farmers over mobile phones when they detect evidence of a drought

CLIMATE CHANGE: Turning Agriculture From Problem to Solution

September 2010

A new EU-Africa partnership report recommends making agriculture a priority to fight malnutrition, hunger and poverty affecting millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa

Here's a quick quiz to test your knowledge of farming and food production in sub-Saharan Africa. Which scenario best reflects the state of farming in Africa today?


http://www.theguardian.com/profile/lindiwe-majele-sibanda

G8 Wrap-Up with Farming First's Lindiwe Sibanda on BBC World Service

September 2010

After the G8 summit at the end of June, Farming First's Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, spoke with BBC World Service's Network Africa radio show to discuss the outcomes of Muskoka 2010. Dr. Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), said,

“We are quite happy with the outcome although more could have been achieved, though what is particularly pleasing is the fact that the leaders have been able to commit to an accountability framework”


http://www.farmingfirst.org/tag/lindiwe-sibanda/

Europe should increase aid to improve agriculture in Africa

September 2010

The Guardian, Tue 26 October 2010

Africa has the means to feed itself but does it have the support – and the will?

The Guardian, Wed 25 August 2010


http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90777/90855/7179558.html

Interview with Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

September 2010

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda has held the position of CEO of FANRPAN since 2004. Her organization is currently coordinating policy research and advocacy programs in 16 southern African countries, all aimed at making Africa a food secure region. Her portfolio includes policy research and advocacy work on issues related to food security, agricultural productivity, natural resources, the environment, and the impact of HIV/Aids on agriculture and food security in southern Africa.

She was interviewed by Ron Israel, TGCI Executive Director.


http://theglobalcitizensinitiative.org/Interviews-with-Gcitizen-Leaders/Interview-with-Lindiwe-Majele-Sibanda.aspx

President of Namibia Awarded 2010 FANRPAN Food Security Policy Leadership Award

September 2010

His Excellency, Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba, President of Namibia, has been awarded the 2010 FANRPAN Food Security Policy Leadership Award. The award was announced in Windhoek, Namibia at the FANRPAN Annual Regional Policy Dialogue on Thursday night.

The FANRPAN Food Security Policy Leadership Award is given to individuals and organizations that have made lasting contributions through policy formulation and implementation, appropriate technology or innovation to food security in FANRPAN member states.

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive, FANRPAN, says: "Africa is neither poor nor incapable of feeding itself, but it needs more fresh initiatives to promote food security, policy development and poverty alleviation. Visionary people such as President Pohamba help create policies for a food-secure Africa."


http://www.southernafricatrust.org/PartnerHighlights_archive.html

Namibian president awarded 2010 FANRPAN Award

13 September 2010

Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba, president of Namibia, was awarded the 2010 FANRPAN Food Security Policy Leadership Award earlier this month. The award was announced at the FANRPAN Annual Regional Policy Dialogue in Windhoek.

President Pohamba and his government have been instrumental in creating responsible fisheries policies in Namibia which have already been recognised by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organisation in 2009.

President Pohamba of Namibia said: "Our industrial fisheries will continue to develop in a sustainable manner. We are keen to capitalise on the gains we have made since independence, to greater benefits of all Namibians. The creation of the Namibian fisheries sector is a success story par excellence. Today, it is considered a model of rigorous management of one of the world's richest fishing grounds, which is still recovering from severe overfishing in the 1970s and 1980s. But it is also a story of government determination to make sure the bounty would be shared among as many citizens as possible, from illiterate villagers to middle managers to a new cadre of fisheries inspectors and patrol officers to businessmen and civil servants."

The FANRPAN Food Security Policy Leadership Award is given to individuals and organisations that have made lasting contributions through policy formulation and implementation, appropriate technology or innovation to food security in FANRPAN member states. Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chief executive, FANRPAN, said: "Africa is neither poor nor incapable of feeding itself, but it needs more fresh initiatives to promote food security, policy development and poverty alleviation. Visionary people such as President Pohamba help create policies for a food-secure Africa."


http://www.bizcommunity.com/Print.aspx?l=7&c=87&ct=1&ci=52080

Reporting Food Security and Trade in a Changing Climate

9 September 2010

Inter Press Service (IPS) Africa teamed up with the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) to provide editorial coverage of the Annual High Level Regional Food Security Policy Dialogue, with the theme of “Livestock & Fisheries Policies for Food Security and Trade in a Changing Climate”, recently held in Windhoek from August 30 – September 03.


http://www.ips.org/institutional/reporting-food-security-and-trade-in-a-changing-climate/

Africa's Agricultural Revolution Picks Up Steam

3 September 2010

"Africa's agricultural sector has the potential not only to feed its own people but to become the breadbasket of the world," Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda said in Windhoek.

"Africa also has 60 per cent of the world's uncultivated arable land, and the potential exists for African yields to grow in value by more than three-fold by the year 2030, from $280 billion today to $880 billion."

Sibanda is the CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, which held its Annual High-Level Policy Dialogue in the Namibian capital from Aug. 30 to Sep. 3.


http://blackchristiannews.com/news/2010/09/africas-agricultural-revolution-picks-up-steam.html

Food security

26 August 2010

By Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Food security: Will Africa feed itself?

Africa has a quarter of the world's arable land but produces only a tenth of our food. On the eve of a pan-African conference on food security, Lindiwe Sibanda asks how African farmers can turn things round, and what questions and answers you have when facing the huge challenges of maintaining and increasing Africa's food production?

One week from now, 200 agricultural experts from across Africa and around the world will meet in Namibia at the annual regional food security policy dialogue of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (Fanrpan) to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing the African continent.

One month from now, a UN summit will take place in New York to discuss the upcoming five-year deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the successes gained so far and the new priorities that must be supported.


http://old.leadershiponline.co.za/articles/environment/803-food-security

FANRPAN Appoints Glasshouse for Global Outreach on Food Security in Africa

26 August 2010

The Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) based in Pretoria, South Africa, has appointed Glasshouse Partnership to provide global communications, advocacy and media relations support across its numerous programmes in 14 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.


http://www.glasshousepartnership.com/blog/fanrpan-appoints-glasshouse-for-global-outreach-on-food-security-in-africa/

Africa has the means to feed itself but does it have the support – and the will?

25 August 2010, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

One week from now, 200 agricultural experts from across Africa and around the world will meet in Namibia at the annual regional food security policy dialogue of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (Fanrpan) to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing the African continent.

Achieving food security in Africa

25 August 2010

A committed effort in every agricultural sector and discipline will reap real benefits for the continent, says Lindiwe Majele Sibanda. Next week, over 200 farmers, policymakers, agricultural researchers, agrodealers and non-governmental organisations from across Africa and around the world will be gathering in Namibia for the annual FANRPAN Policy Dialogue to discuss the state of food security in sub-Saharan Africa and future priorities for continuing progress.

Food security on the continent is still only a goal; the reality is that agricultural growth has been erratic, leaving one third of the African population chronically malnourished.


http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/blog/index.php/2010/08/achieving-food-security-africa/

G8 Gets Praise for Re-committing to Food Security

30 June 2010

At the G8 summit this past weekend, leaders renewed their commitment to food security. They stood by their pledge to spend (US) $22 for sustainable agriculture by 2012.

The commitment was made last year at the L'Aquila summit in Italy. So far, about $6 billion has been allocated.

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), a member of the Farming First coalition. Farming First represents about 130 organizations worldwide.


http://www.voanews.com/content/decapua-g8-farming-first-28jun10-97309954/155093.html

Technological Innovation Will Help African Farmers Overcome Climate Change

16 June 2010

Technological innovation has been described as a major panacea to help African farmers overcome and cope with the ever increasing challenges posed by climate change.

The Chief Executive Officer of the South-African based Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, who stated this in a forum said that temperatures have increased and the danger is that agriculture is the backbone of Africa's economies.


http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/6085619-technological-innovation-will-help-african-farmers-overcome-climate-change

Malawi President Calls for Greater Cooperation in Africa to Improve Food Security

18 May 2010

Exclusive Interview between His Excellency Ngwazi Dr. Bingu wa Mutharika, State President of the Republic of Malawi & Chairman of the African Union and Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, FANRPAN CEO

Yesterday African leaders concluded that agricultural development is the most effective strategy for boosting economic growth in Africa. This was said during a plenary session on “A New Vision for African Agriculture: The “Engine for Growth” at the World Economic Forum on Africa in Dar es Salaam.

The Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) CEO, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda had an opportunity to interview the President of the Republic of Malawi who is also the current Chair of the African Union, H.E. Ngwazi Dr. Bingu wa Mutharika on his vision for Africa.


http://www.caadp.net/news/?p=698

Innovative Ways of Hearing Farmers' Voices

May 2010

This is a three part series about Danielle Nierenberg's visit to the Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network in Pretoria, South Africa. Cross posted from Worldwatch Institute's Nourishing the Planet.

Part I: Working to connect farmers, researchers, and policy makers in Africa

Danielle and FANRPAN staffThe Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) lives up to its name by linking farmers, businesses, academia, researchers, donors, and national and regional governments. “One thing that we {Africa} fail to do is form coalitions for a common cause,” says Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, the CEO of FANRPAN. But by connecting rural farmers directly to the private sector, to policy-makers, and to the agricultural research community, they're trying to build a food secure Africa.


http://www.thoughtleader.co.za/daniellenierenberg/2010/05/26/innovative-ways-of-hearing-farmers-voices/

African states sow seeds of cooperation

May 2010

After 10 years of discussion and research, members of the Southern African Development Community have agreed a system to improve the regulation and sale of seeds across borders, which should improve food security across Africa, says Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.


http://www.theguardian.com/katine/katine-chronicles-blog/2010/apr/29/african-seed-harmonisation

Enticing Africa's youth to agriculture

May 2010

By Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Today's generation of young people is the largest in history. In developing countries, young people, aged 15 to 24 years old, make up on average 20 percent of the global population and represent a huge potential resource to their countries.

Yet ironically, rural areas are not benefiting fully from this resource (Globally, young people are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults). In fact, many rural communities are ageing rapidly precisely because, in the absence of incentives to remain, young women and men are leaving rural areas to seek employment opportunities elsewhere.

In Africa, the demographics are even more pronounced and troubling. Around 44 percent of the total population of sub-Saharan Africa is under the age of 16, making it the youngest region in the world.

Most of this over 200 million group is employed in agriculture, yet 40 percent of the total unemployed in Africa are youths, and 70 percent of these live in rural areas, where young people face particular constraints in gaining access to land, credit, training and new technologies.

By 2050, predictions are that 60 percent of people in Africa will be living in cities.


http://www.youtrust.org/blogs/?sourceId=a6d35dba-faa5-4ddc-9c05-d0e24721ee49&sourceSite=alertnet

African states sow seeds of cooperation

29 April 2010, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Dismal figures dominate conversations on food security in Africa.Seed security is an issue that farmers around the world consider vitally important to protecting their crops and boosting productivity. Yet amid global debates on achieving food security and better rural livelihoods, this issue is often given only peripheral attention.

News 2009

Investment, Information Keys To Productivity

8 September 2009

Sep 25 2009 (IPS) – Sustained investment in agriculture accompanied by effective and inclusive policies are key strategies for Southern Africa to address the global food crisis.

This was the declaration made by 200 international delegates – including farmers, researchers, private sector representatives, media and policy makers – who gathered in the Malawian capital, Lilongwe, from Sep. 2 to 5 for the annual policy dialogue hosted by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN).


http://africa.ipsterraviva.net/2009/08/26/investment-information-keys-to-productivity/

Climate change experts must remember Africa and agriculture

8 September 2009

When Africans arrive in Copenhagen later this year, they will have one important message to deliver to their peers: a climate change deal without agriculture is no deal for Africa, argues Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Agriculture is the life-blood of the African economy. Some 75% of the continent's population are farmers, and the crops they grow provide an important means of livelihood for the most vulnerable smallholder farmers. Agriculture also gives those in the rural sector access to a potential source of additional income if they have surplus crops that can be sold at market. Agricultural commodities already represent more than one-third of total exports from Africa.


http://cquestor.blogspot.com/2009/09/climate-change-experts-must-remember.html

Climate change experts must remember Africa and agriculture

7 September 2009, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Agriculture is the life-blood of the African economy. Some 75% of the continent's population are farmers, and the crops they grow provide an important means of livelihood for the most vulnerable smallholder farmers. Agriculture also gives those in the rural sector access to a potential source of additional income if they have surplus crops that can be sold at market. Agricultural commodities already represent more than one-third of total exports from Africa.

The Big Race is the Copenhagen One

1 September 2009

Nalisha Kalideen interviews LINDIWE MAJELE SIBANDA, CEO of the Food and Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network.


http://africa.ipsterraviva.net/2009/09/01/the-big-race-is-the-copenhagen-one/

Africa: Trade Carbon for Food Security

30 August 2009

Nairobi Forget the view of climate change as impending catastrophe for a moment: if negotiators can recognise sustainable agriculture by African smallholders and forests as mitigating factors in climate change, carbon trading could become an important support for Africa's food security.

There's no doubt that climate change is a threat: Africa contributes only 3.8 percent of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, but it will suffer worst impacts of climate change.

Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) CEO, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, urged Africa to speak with one voice in pushing for the inclusion of sustainable agriculture in the carbon trade.

“Unless the successor to the Kyoto Protocol values the contribution that sustainable agriculture can make to the global carbon market, Africa is still outside the fence,” said Sibanda.


http://www.carbonoffsetsdaily.com/news-channels/global/africa-trade-carbon-for-food-security-11227.htm

From food aid to farm support: transforming agricultural policy in Africa

July 2009

Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and leading spokesperson for the Farming First initiative. She calls for action to transform agricultural policy in Africa to allow Africa's farmers to sustain themselves.

During the 2008 food crisis, it became clear that global governance systems on food security were unable to protect those most at risk. Embargoes on exports by certain countries led to food shortages elsewhere, particularly in Africa, alarming politicians with the prospect of a hungry electorate. Millions of farmers in Africa depend on what they produce day to day to survive. But to protect them from food insecurity and the need for food aid, we have to transform global agricultural policy from a system of food aid to farmer empowerment.


http://www.new-ag.info/en/view/point.php?a=780

FANRPAN CEO Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda says WARM will be extended if it succeeds

June 2009

It is set to run for three years in Malawi and Mozambique with universities, national agricultural and research organisations and organisations like the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), Oxfam, World Vision, the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Graça Machel Development Foundation all on board.


http://southasia.oneworld.net/archive/globalheadlines/empowering-women-farmers-in-southern-africa#.UgsqbtKouSo

Put farming first in Africa

27 April 2009, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda

Since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were endorsed by 192 UN member states in September 2000, they have served as a benchmark for how the international development community drafts policy and allocates funding through to the year 2015.

Videos 2014: The 2014 Borlaug Dialogue

2014 Panel: Focus on Africa - Policy and Partnerships

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda led this panel focused on Africa, with H.E. Florence Chenoweth, Birtukan Dagnachew, H.E. Gerardine Mukeshimana, Paul Schickler, and H.E. Joseph Sam Sesay.

2014 Keynote: H.E. Kanayo F. Nwanze

2014 Panel: Trendlines for Political Stability, Global Trade and Potential Disruptions

Videos 2014: IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Opening session held at the congress in October 2014

Session at the IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Session at the IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Session at the IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Session at the IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Closing session at the IARU Sustainability Science Congress

Videos 2013

September

Transformative partnerships for a food-secure world

Learning together transforms agriculture and lives. Narrated by food policy leader Lindiwe Majele Sibanda.

August

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda is awarded the prize for her many years of work on research and development through policy and advocacy in southern Africa through the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), where she has served as CEO since 2004.

July

Real change in food security through innovation platforms, where science marries local know-how The change starts from those who are affected by the problem being around the table with those who want to experiment research and deliver options for development, sitting as equal partners. (Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda) Science alone cannot help Africa feed itself. That was a strong message from Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer of the Food Agriculture and Natural Resource Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) at the recent Africa Agricultural Science Week (AASW) organised by the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), 15-19 July, 2013.

June

Living Land HaSSP

May

A New Science of Agriculture to Advance Global Food Security

The Chicago council

In May Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chief executive officer and head of mission, Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network joined others in Chicago for the Gobal Food Security Symposium 2013. The event themed: Capitalizing on the Power of Science, Trade, and Business to End Hunger and Poverty: A New Agenda for Food Security was chaired by Dr. Barbara Schaal, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Mary-Dell Chilton distinguished professor, Washington University in St. Louis. Others in attendance includes Mr. Brett Begemann, president and chief commercial officer, Monsanto Company, Dr. Cutberto (Bert) Garza, provost and dean of faculties, Boston College, Dr. Rob Horsch, deputy director of research and development, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Dr. Mauricio Antonio Lopes, president, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation and Dr. Ren Wang, assistant director general, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

January

Markets, Policies and Social Systems

ACIAR Australia

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN). Other participants includes Chair - Dr Gabrielle Persley, ?Moderator Mr David Nielson, Lead Agriculture Services Specialist, World Bank. Dr Karen Brooks, Director, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Dr Vivienne Anthony, Senior Advisor, Syngenta Foundation ?and Dr Nick Vink, President, African Agricultural Economists Society

Videos 2012

December

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO FANRPAN moderated the Opening & High Level Panel: Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day during the COP 18 held in Doha, Qatar. This was filmed live at Agriculture, Landscapes and Livelihoods Day 5, 3 December 2012 in Doha, Qatar. http://www.agricultureday.org ?. A opening keynote address was done by Mr Fahad Bin Mohammed Al-Attiya, Chairman of the Qatar National Food Security Commission.

The event looked at identifying scalable solutions, gaps, and trade offs in addressing climate change impacts for agriculture, landscapes and livelihoods Other dignitaries that were part of the panel includes Tony La Vina, Dean, Ateneo School of Government, The Philippines, Professor Judi Wakhungu, Executive Director of the African Centre for Technology Studies, Robert Carlson, President, World Farmers' Organisation, Dr Mahmoud Solh, Director General, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).

November

2012 FANRPAN presents Gogo Farmers

FANRPAN presents CAADP Overview 2011

September

Women Accessing Realigned Markets – Lindiwe Sibanda talks about WARM

by Agriculture for Impact

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) and Montpellier Panellist talks about the 'Women Accessing Re-aligned Markets' (WARM) programme in the video.

Videos 2011

December

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda talks about "No Agriculture No Deal"

AgriTV interviews FANRPAN about COP17

Peter Kent: Canada's Environment Minister announces recipients of AARC

On November 25, Canada's Environment Minister, the Honourable Peter Kent, announced funding for seven winning projects from across Africa that will support important and innovative initiatives to better equip the African continent to deal with the effects of climate change. The African Adaptation Research Centres (AARC) initiative is a three-year, $10 million project managed by IDRC with funding provided by the Government of Canada, as part of Canada's commitment to fast-start climate change financing promised under the Copenhagen Accord.

Also in attendance at the Ottawa announcement were two of the AARC recipients: Saïd Hounkponou from Benin's Initiatives pour un Développement Intégré Durable and via video from South Africa, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda from the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Network. The effects of climate change pose immense challenges for Africans in the coming decades. The AARC initiative will help build the leadership and research expertise required to help guide decision-makers in setting priorities and developing effective adaptation strategies.

June

Africa 2011 - Innovative Partnerships for Development

The G20 Seoul Consensus for Shared Growth reiterates the role of business as an enabler of development in low-income countries. How can effective partnerships with the business community be created and scaled to unlock Africa's development potential?

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Chief Executive Officer and Head of Mission, Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), South Africa took part in a discussion that was meant to address issues of trading comparative advantage, resource generation, collective learning, risk sharing.

Other panellists include:

Kofi Annan, Secretary-General, United Nations (1997-2006); Member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum, Godfrey G. Gomwe, Executive Director, Anglo American South Africa, South Africa, Jakaya M. Kikwete, President of Tanzania, Strive Masiyiwa, Group Executive Chairman, Econet Wireless Group, South Africa, Rajiv J. Shah, Administrator, US Agency for International Development (USAID), USA; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa; Young Global Leader and Mark Suzman, Director, Policy and Advocacy, Global Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA. It was chaired by Robert Greenhill, Managing Director and Chief Business Officer, World Economic Forum.

How can Africa adapt to climate change?

AfricaAdapt

Animated excerpts from Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda's keynote address on taking community-led responses to climate change to the global level at the 2011 AfricaAdapt Symposium.

Videos 2010

December

In Mozambique: Lessons for African Agriculture and Food Security

farmingfirst.org

Two experts on African agricultural development visited farms in Mozambique ahead of the G20 meeting in Pittsburgh.

In this video, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, and Dr. Julie Howard, Executive Director of the Partnership to End Hunger and Poverty in Africa, listen to farmers and translate their concerns to the rest of the world.

Policymakers must target development aid in such a way that it captures agriculture's true contribution to the economy. Aid should also aim to build long-term, sustainable growth and improved rural livelihoods.

October

Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda speaks to the late President of Malawi speaks with FANRPAN about food security

May

FANRPAN Endorsement

Climate Change

Seed Security: An Intro with Dr Lindiwe Sibanda

April

What is the role of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) in agricultural development and research?

FANRPAN CEO & Head of Mission, Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, chaired the Farming First session on Public-Private Partnerships session at the GCARD 2010 conference, “Better Benefiting the Poor through Public-Private Partnerships for Innovation and Action”. The main question addressed was: “To sustainably reach the MDG goals, what is the role of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) in agricultural development and research?” Hereunder is an interview with Dr Lindiwe Majele Sibanda from 25/02/2009.

Videos 2009

December

Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, CEO of FANPRAN, on agriculture and climate change

World Farmers

The ability of agriculture to adapt and withstand the impacts of climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our time. Climate change presents a very real threat to the livelihoods and food security for millions of people in developing countries. Yet, agriculture is also adding to the climate change problem. Current practices, including the conversion of forests and grasslands for crops and pasture, contribute some 31 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.

A changing planet brings an unprecedented opportunity to turn around agriculture in developing countries, making it more sustainable, reducing its negative impacts on the global environment, and at the same time, enhancing food security.

Agriculture & Rural Development Day (ARDD) is a one-day event on Saturday, 12 December 2009 at the Faculty of Life Sciences (LIFE) at the University of Copenhagen that will bring together approximately 300 policymakers, negotiators, rural development practitioners, producers, civil society and the agricultural and climate change scientific community, in order to build consensus on what has to be done to fully incorporate agriculture into the post-Copenhagen climate agenda, and to discuss a clear workplan of strategies and actions needed to address climate change adaptation and mitigation in the agriculture sector.

Key issues that will be discussed at ARDD: Impact of climate change on development, poverty and food security Triple challenge of increasing food productivity, climate resilience and reducing emissions Unlocking the potential of emissions markets for smallholder farmers Innovations in the agricultural sector of relevance to the climate change agenda

October

VOA's Ndimyake Mwakalyelye talks to Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, who heads the Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, about climate change.

September

In Mozambique: Lessons for African Agriculture and Food Security

Two experts on African agricultural development visited farms in Mozambique ahead of the G20 meeting in Pittsburgh.

In this video, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, CEO of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network, and Dr. Julie Howard, Executive Director of the Partnership to End Hunger and Poverty in Africa, listen to farmers and translate their concerns to the rest of the world.

Policymakers must target development aid in such a way that it captures agriculture's true contribution to the economy. Aid should also aim to build long-term, sustainable growth and improved rural livelihoods.

May

The Obama Agriculture Plan - Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, FANRPAN

www.farmingfirst.org?Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda discusses the potential impact of $448 million in new funding announved by the Obama administration to address the global food crisis. The Obama plan also aims to double agriculture-related investment to $1 billion by 2010.

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda on African Agriculture

Farming First

farmingfirst.org

Dr. Sibanda, Chief Executive Director of the Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) discusses the proceedings of CSD-17, the focus on agriculture and Africa, and the need to join forces to turn words into actions. .

April

CNBC Africa interview with Farming First's Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda

www.farmingfirst.org

Dr. Sibanda, CEO of FANRPAN (www.fanrpan.org), speaks live with CNBC Africa about how agriculture policy can positively impact African development and investment. Dr. Sibanda highlights the importance of a secure marketplace and access to the inputs which allow farmers to be transformed into small-scale entrpreneurs. She suggests the need to link up all of the various agriculture-related interventions which are taking place so that they improve outcomes for farmers..

February

Lindiwe Sibanda: Inclusive Policy Processes are critical to African Green Revolution February 2009

Lindiwe Sibanda was interviewed at the Salzburg Global Seminar by Susanna Thorpe, of WREN Media. This interview was during a high-level conference entitled "Toward a 'Green Revolution' in Africa?". The Salzburg Global Seminar partnered with the Institute of Development Studies and the Future Agricultures Consortium, bringing together stake holders from around the globe, to work on the challenges facing Africa regarding agriculture and farming.

'Farming First' Conference - Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda, FANRPAN

www.farmingfirst.org?Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) speaks at 'Farming First' Conference in New York on 24 February 2009.

'Farming First' Conference - Q&A - Part 1 of 2

www.farmingfirst.org

Ajay Vashee of the International Federation of Agricultural Producers, Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (NANRPAN), and Dr. Marjatta Eilitta of the International Center for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development address audience questions at the Farming First News Conference on 24 February 2009. In this segment, Mr. Vashee, Dr. Eilitta and Dr. Sibanda answer the questions:

- Where does the world stand in the global push? Are you still planning stages or is anything going forth yet?

- Why aren't other countries replicating the Malawi success story?

- What other kinds of cash crops are being grown in Africa? Who is responsible or who are the sources of this funding?

Lindiwe Sibanda: Inclusive Policy Processes are critical to African Green Revolution

Salzburg Global Seminar

Lindiwe Sibanda was interviewed at the Salzburg Global Seminar by Susanna Thorpe, of WREN Media. This interview was during a high-level conference entitled "Toward a 'Green Revolution' in Africa?". The Salzburg Global Seminar partnered with the Institute of Development Studies and the Future Agricultures Consortium, bringing together stake holders from around the globe, to work on the challenges facing Africa regarding agriculture and farming.

'Farming First' Conference - Interview: Dr. Lindiwe Sibanda

Dr. Lindiwe Majele Sibanda of the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) discusses Farming First, food security and the importance of agriculture at the 'Farming First' Conference in New York on 24 February 2009.

Past and Present Positions

  1. Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN): Chief Executive Officer and Head of Diplomatic Mission (2004 to date).
  2. Linds Agricultural Services and Linds UK: Founder and Managing Director (1997-2004).
  3. Macpherson Consulting Group: Agriculture and Rural Development Specialist (1993-1996).
  4. Department of Animal physiology in the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Zimbabwe: Lecturer (1992-1994).
  5. Department of Animal Science at the University of Zimbabwe: Research Fellow for an IDRC-funded Small Ruminants project (1989-1991).

Professional affiliations

Currently serves as advisor to international and regional agriculture development initiatives that include two CGIAR Boards, four global research programmes on Water, Climate Change, Policy Reform and UK Youth Theatre of Debate production group.

Boards and Advisory Roles

Dr Sibanda serves in numerous international food security-related boards and as adviser to initiatives advocating for a holistic approach to sustainable agricultural development.

  • 010 Co-Chair for the The African Growth and Development Policy (AGRODEP)
    This is a modelling consortium whose goal of AGRODEP is to position African experts to take a leading role in both (1) the study of strategic development questions facing African countries as a group and (2) the broader agricultural growth and policy debate, which traditionally has been dominated by external actors and concerns. The consortium is driven through a collaboration among the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); the Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in East and Central Africa (ASARECA); the West African Council on Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD); and the Food, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Policy Network (FANRPAN).
  • 2009-2015 CIMMYT - Mexico
    Member of the Board of Trustees for CIMMYT, one of 15 global centres of the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). CIMMYT focuses on maize and wheat research, has its headquarters in Mexico and employs about 100 specialized research staff and 500 support staff from about 40 countries.
  • 2009-2012 International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) - Kenya
    Chairperson of the Board of Trustees for the International Agricultural Research (ILRI), one of 15 global centres for the Consultative Group. ILRI works in the fields of livestock research, training and information in all tropical developing regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean. ILRI was formed in 1994, has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya and a second principal campus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ILRI employs 653 staff across 13 countries.
  • 2009 to date Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, SWEDEN
    Advisor to the School of Natural Resources Management and Livelihoods (NRML).
  • 2008 to date Nelson Mandela HIV and AIDS Hyper-endemic Pillar, South Africa
    The Nelson Mandela Foundation embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu, and social justice. The Foundation's work is a celebration of Mr. Mandela's life. The Nelson Mandela Foundation and the Joachim Chissano Foundation co-chair the AIDS2031 hyper-endemic pillar (one of nine pillars of the AIDS2031 initiative). The initiative looks at issues surrounding HIV/AIDS and aims to change the face of the disease by 2031, the year which marks 50 years after the first reported case of AIDS.
  • 2008 to date Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA)- Ghana
    Advisor to FARA Board for the Policy and Markets Platform.
  • 2007-2009 Research Into Use (RIU) Program for Africa and Asia.
    RIU is a Programme of the UK Department for International Development (DFID). The RIU programme was designed to put the results of agricultural and natural resources research into use to reduce poverty, promote economic growth and mitigate environmental problems.
  • 1997-2003 Board of Governors for the Food Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Network-FANRPAN
    Zimbabwe Member Board of Governors for the Food Agriculture Natural Resources Policy Network-FANRPAN (1997-2001) and Board Chairperson (2001-2003).

Honours and Awards

  • In August 2010 was co-opted into the Guardian Global Development Advisory Panel as one of the world's most influential thinkers and provocative new voices.
  • In 2012 was co-opted Global citizen and recognised as someone who identifies with being a part of an emerging world community, and whose actions contribute to building this community's values and practices.

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